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Florida Power & Light

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This article is part of the Coal Issues portal on SourceWatch, a project of CoalSwarm and the Center for Media and Democracy. See here for help on adding material to CoalSwarm.

This article is part of the Center for Media & Democracy's focus on the fallout of nuclear "spin."

Florida Power & Light (FPL) is the main subsidiary of FPL Group, which also owns FPL Energy (now NextEra Energy Resources), an operator of wind, solar, nuclear, and some coal facilities. Florida Power & Light has power stations at fourteen different locations, the bulk gas-fired stations. It also operates two nuclear power stations (Turkey Point and St. Lucie in Florida) and two coal-fired power stations, the St. Johns River Power Park in Florida and the Scherer Steam Generating Station in Georgia.[1]

Existing Coal Plants

Florida Power & Light has partial ownership of the following plants:[1]

Plant State Year(s) Built Capacity
Scherer Steam Generating Station GA 1982, 1984, 1987, 1989 3,564 MW
St. Johns River Power Park FL 1987, 1988 1,358 MW

Florida Power & Light owns 75% of Unit 4 of the Scherer Station, and 20% of two units of St. Johns.

CEO compensation

In May 2007, Forbes listed FPL Group CEO Lewis Hay III as receiving $11.82 million in total compensation for the latest fiscal year, with a five-year total compensation of $38.13 million. He ranked 8th on the list of CEOs in the Utilities industry, and 159th out of all CEOs in the United States.[2]

Nuclear plants

Turkey Point safety issues

In March 2009, as FPL worked on plans to build two new nuclear reactors at its Turkey Point plant in South Miami-Dade County, evidence surfaced about a 2008 incident where the plant's top nuclear operator, David Hoffman resigned because he felt the company pressured plant employees to not follow safety procedures in order to save money. Hoffman blasted FPL for "constantly putting cost savings ahead of safety and creating a horrible morale problem." His resignation letter alleged, "People are not valued and are treated like equipment and numbers." Hoffman had "complained to the utility several times about issues in which he thought executives let cost-cutting 'interfere with the proper maintenance' of the Turkey Point reactors. ... The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has found 25 or more violations of reliability standards because of the incident, and FPL is now facing millions of dollars in fines." [3]

A 2008 survey of Turkey Point workers about the plant's system for reporting safety issues, the Employee Concerns Program (ECP) "found that more than one in four -- 29.2 percent -- disagreed with the following statement: 'I am confident that nuclear safety and quality issues reported through the ECP are thoroughly investigated and appropriately resolved.' More than one in three disagreed with this following statement: 'I can use the ECP without fear of retaliation.'" [3]

Report: FP&L's nuclear plants not replacing coal

A 2011 report by NC Warn, "New Nuclear Power is Ruining Climate Protection Efforts and Harming Customers", argues that companies like Florida Power & Light have said they want to lead the way to a “low carbon” future by building more nuclear power plants, but instead of replacing their coal-burning plants with nuclear power, the companies "plan to keep operating most or all of their coal plants indefinitely, while adding more nuclear (and fossil fuel) plants so they can expand electricity sales both within and outside the region."

The report states that "Florida Power & Light plans to increase generating capacity by an ambitious 9,510 MW, including over 5,000 MW of natural gas units. If completed, two new AP1000s at Turkey Point would contribute more than 2,200 MW of new capacity (the opening date is now projected to be after the 2020 planning horizon). FP&L does not project any coal closures at this time."[4]

Contact details

Website: http://www.fpl.com/

Articles and Resources

Related SourceWatch Articles

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 "About Us — Florida Power & Light Company", Florida Power & Light Company website, accessed November 2008.
  2. CEO Compensation: #159 Lewis Hay III, Forbes.com, May 3, 2007.
  3. 3.0 3.1 John Dorschner, "Court papers reveal nuclear feud at Turkey Point: The top nuclear operator at Turkey Point resigned after a huge outage because he felt his bosses were demanding an unsafe restart," Miami Herald (Florida), March 12, 2009.
  4. Jim Warren, "New Nuclear Power is Ruining Climate Protection Efforts and Harming Customers" NC Warn, 2011 Report.

External resources

External articles

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