CREDO-CMD-ad-1100X orange24.png

Gemfibrozil

From SourceWatch
Jump to: navigation, search

WARNING! Sewage sludge is toxic. Food should not be grown in "biosolids." Join the Food Rights Network.

Gemfibrozil is a fibrate, a type of pharmaceutical used to reduce the production of triglycerides in the liver.[1]

Why It's Prescribed

Gemfibrozil is prescribed to reduce the amount of cholesterol and triglycerides in patients' blood.[2]

Labeled uses include:[3] Hyperlipidemia, Hypertriglyceridemia, Primary Prevention of Coronary Heart Disease.

Additionally, unlabeled uses include:[4] High Density Lipoid Deficiency.

Form, Route, and Dosage

Gemfibrozil is available as a 600mg tablet to take orally.[5][6] Patients generally take one tablet twice daily, 30 minutes before morning and evening meals, for a total of 1200mg per day.

Risks

Side Effects

Some patients taking this medication might experience side effects, including:[7]

  • stomach pain
  • heartburn
  • muscle pain, tenderness, or weakness
  • blurred vision

Overdoses

Patients may overdose on this medication if they take too much of it. Some symptoms of overdose include:[8]

  • stomach cramps
  • diarrhea
  • joint and muscle pain
  • nausea
  • vomiting

As a Pollutant

Because humans and animals often do not fully metabolize pharmaceuticals in their body, they can excrete drugs or their breakdown products, which may the enter the environment.[9]

In Sewage Sludge

Gemfibrozil has been found in sewage sludge. In the Targeted National Sewage Sludge Survey, a 2009 test of 84 samples of sewage sludge from around the U.S., the EPA found gemfibrozil in 76 samples (90%) in concentrations ranging from 12.1 to 2,650 parts per billion.[10] There are no federal regulations governing how much of this drug may be present in sewage sludge applied to land as fertilizer.

In Drinking Water

An Associated Press investigation found that, of 62 metropolitan areas in the U.S., only 28 tested for pharmaceuticals, and 24 found pharmaceuticals in the drinking water when they tested it.[11] Of those tested, Philadelphia tested positive for gemfibrozil (as well as 55 other drugs).[12]

Articles and resources

Related SourceWatch articles

References

  1. Gemfibrozil: MedlinePlus Drug Information, Accessed August 31, 2010.
  2. Gemfibrozil: MedlinePlus Drug Information, Accessed August 31, 2010.
  3. Gemfibrozil Oral: Dosage, Uses, and Warnings, Accessed September 3, 2010.
  4. Gemfibrozil Oral: Dosage, Uses, and Warnings, Accessed September 3, 2010.
  5. Gemfibrozil: MedlinePlus Drug Information, Accessed August 31, 2010.
  6. Drugstore.com, Accessed September 4, 2010.
  7. Gemfibrozil: MedlinePlus Drug Information, Accessed August 31, 2010.
  8. Gemfibrozil: MedlinePlus Drug Information, Accessed August 31, 2010.
  9. O.A.H. Jones, N. Voulvoulis, and J.N. Lester, Human Pharmaceuticals in Wastewater Treatment Processes, Environmental Science and Technology, 2005.
  10. Targeted National Sewage Sludge Survey Report, US EPA website, Accessed August 28, 2010.
  11. AN AP INVESTIGATION : Pharmaceuticals Found in Drinking Water, Associated Press, Accessed September 3, 2010.
  12. Pharmawater-Metros-By-Results, Associated Press, Accessed September 3, 2010.

External resources

External articles