International Center on Nonviolent Conflict

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The International Center on Nonviolent Conflict (ICNC) has been accused by critics of acting in the service of imperialism, and was founded by Council on Foreign Relations board member, Peter Ackerman. Despite these criticisms the ICNC describes itself as "an independent, nonprofit educational foundation that develops and encourages the study and use of civilian-based, nonmilitary strategies to establish and defend human rights, democracy and justice worldwide."[1] For further details of the long-running debate between critical scholars and the ICNC, see http://michaeljamesbarker.wordpress.com/icnc/

The ICNC states that it "uses television broadcast networks, the Internet, and off-air and offline media to disseminate video programming and books" to help "promote the history and ideas of nonviolent conflict in open or closed societies where rights or self-determination are at issue." It also "conducts meetings and briefings, co-sponsors conferences, and makes available articles and features, to encourage international institutions and decision makers to support civilian-based, nonviolent movements."[2]

2006 Principals

Source

In 2007, their website also listed two new additions to their staff:[3]

In 2010, they added another six members of staff:

In 2012, they added one more member of staff: [5]

Academic Advisory Board (2010)

Accessed March 2010: [6]

  • Stephen Zunes - Professor of Politics and International Studies, University of San Francisco; Chair, ICNC Academic Advisors Committee
  • Howard Barrell - Senior Lecturer, Cardiff University
  • Cynthia Boaz - Assistant Professor of Political Science, Sonoma State University
  • Roddy Brett - Professor, Universidad del Rosario
  • Erica Chenoweth - Assistant Professor of Government, Wesleyan University
  • Janet Cherry - Senior Lecturer in Development Studies, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University
  • Kevin Clements - Chair of Peace and Conflict Studies, University of Otago
  • Barry Gan - Professor of Philosophy, St. Bonaventure University
  • John Gould - Associate Professor of Political Science, Colorado College
  • Mary King - Distinguished Scholar, American University Center for Global Peace
  • Lester Kurtz - Professor of Sociology, George Mason University
  • Brian Martin - Professor of Social Sciences, University of Wollongong, Australia
  • Scott O'Bryan - Associate Professor of East Asian Languages and Culture, University of Indiana
  • Lee Smithey - Assistant Professor of Sociology, Swarthmore College
  • Kurt Schock - Associate Professor of Sociology and Global Affairs, Rutgers University
  • Victoria Tin-bor Hui - Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of Notre Dame
  • Stellan Vinthagen - Professor, Goteborg University

The list of board members was first placed online in March 2010. Prior to this, frequent requests to the ICNC by email for details of these board members were ignored.

As of 2013 a new advisory board member is Chaiwat Satha-Anand followed by Jason MacLeod.

Funding

On its website it states that [1] it "is funded entirely by the family philanthropy of the founding chair." (Peter Ackerman). It also states that "It does not accept funding from any government." [2]

A Force More Powerful

In 2000, Peter Ackerman and Jack DuVall published the book A Force More Powerful: A Century of Nonviolent Conflict. Since then the book has been made into a documentary and computer game with the same name. The film was directed and produced by Steve York of York Zimmerman Inc., who also served as the main advisor for the production of the computer game. [3][4]

USIP-links

Strategic Nonviolent Conflict: Lessons from the Past, Ideas for the Future

In 2002 the USIP released a report titled Strategic Nonviolent Conflict: Lessons from the Past, Ideas for the Future which was the "product of a conference co-sponsored by the United States Institute of Peace and the International Center on Nonviolent Conflict (ICNC)... The report was written by USIP staff members John T. Crist, program officer in the fellowship program, Harriet Hentges, executive vice president, and Daniel Serwer, director of the Balkans Initiative, with assistance from Samantha Williams, program officer in the Research and Studies Program, and consultation and editing by ICNC chair Peter Ackerman and director Jack DuVall." [7]

The Evolution of People Power and Nonviolent Conflict: Best Practices and Future Applications

"In collaboration with International Center on Nonviolent Conflict" the USIP hosted a panel discussion on September 6, 2006, titled The Evolution of People Power and Nonviolent Conflict: Best Practices and Future Applications. Speakers included Peter Ackerman, Steve York, Srdja Popovic, Slobodan Djinovic, Andrej Milivojevic, James O'Brien (Commentator; former Special Presidential Envoy for the Balkans and Senior Advisor to the Secretary, Principal, The Albright Group), and Carola Weil, (Moderator; U.S. Institute of Peace). [8]

International Conference on Civil Resistance and Power Politics

In 2006, a conference was "organised jointly by the Centre for International Studies at Oxford University's Department of Politics and International Relations and the European Studies Centre at St Antony's College. It is generously funded by the International Center for Nonviolent Conflict, Washington DC; the Zeit Foundation, Hamburg; and the Canadian government." [9]

The conference was also sponsored by the USIP, Rockefeller Brothers Fund, British Academy, Foreign and Commonwealth Office, and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Norway. [10]

For more details see International Conference on Civil Resistance and Power Politics

Freedom House Study

In 2005 "A major new study released today by Freedom House shows that nonviolent "people power" movements are the strongest force in most successful transitions to democracy". "Freedom House prepared the study with support from the International Center on Nonviolent Conflict". [11]

Contact Details

Website: www.nonviolent-conflict.org

Resources and articles

SourceWatch Resources

References

  1. "Who We Are", International Center on Nonviolent Conflict website, accessed March 2009.
  2. International Center on Nonviolent Conflict, "What We Do", International Center on Nonviolent Conflict website, accessed March 2009.
  3. Who We Are, International Center on Nonviolent Conflict, accessed August 3, 2007.
  4. Stephen Zunes, Inaccurate and unfair attacks on the ICNC, Green Left Review, 31 August 2007.
  5. ICNC Ashley Farnan, organizational web page, accessed July 5, 2012.
  6. Academic Advisors, International Center on Nonviolent Conflict, accessed March 21, 2010.
  7. Strategic Nonviolent Conflict: Lessons from the Past, Ideas for the Future, USIP, accessed December 17, 2007.
  8. The Evolution of People Power and Nonviolent Conflict: Best Practices and Future Applications, USIP, accessed December 17, 2007.
  9. Past Centre Events, Centre for International Studies, accessed August 30, 2007.
  10. Program, International Conference on Civil Resistance and Power Politics, accessed August 30, 2007.
  11. Study: Nonviolent Civic Resistance Key Factor in Building Durable Democracies, Freedom House, accessed December 17, 2007.
  12. Fletcher Summer Institute for the Advanced Study of Nonviolent Conflict, Relief Web, accessed December 17, 2007.

Critical Resources