Jeffrey D. McCausland

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Jeffrey D. McCausland, founder and CEO of Diamond6 Leadership and Strategy, is a retired U.S. Army Colonel, a military analyst for CBS and a former participant in the Pentagon military analyst program, which has since been eliminated. McCausland has served in a variety of command and staff positions, including the National Security Council Staff, U.S. Army War College in Carlisle, PA and the Pentagon. Mr. McCausland has published and lectured broadly on military affairs, European security issues, the Gulf War, and leadership throughout the United States and over twelve countries. His knowledge and expertise has earned him invitations to serve as a consultant and adjunct faculty member to many leading organizations such as the Center for Strategic and International Studies and the RAND Corporation in Washington. He has served as a national security consultant to CBS radio and television as a frequent commentator on the war in Iraq and Afghanistan. [1]


Military career

A biographical note states that he "completed his active duty service in the U.S. Army in 2002 culminating his career as Dean of Academics, U.S. Army War College, PA. Upon retirement Dr. McCausland accepted the Class of 1961 Chair of Leadership at the United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD and served there from 2002-2004. He is a graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point and was commissioned in field artillery. He is also a graduate of the U.S. Army airborne and ranger schools as well as the Command and General Staff College at Ft. Leavenworth, KA. He holds both a Masters and Ph.D. from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University."[2]

"Dr. McCausland served in a variety of command and staff positions both in the U. S. and Europe,including Director for Defense Policy and Arms Control on the National Security Council Staff during the Kosovo crisis. He also worked on the Treaty on Conventional Armed Forces in Europe (CFE) as a member of the Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations, US Army Staff, the Pentagon. Following this he assumed command of a field artillery battalion stationed in Europe and deployed his unit to Saudi Arabia for Operations Desert Shield and Storm in 1990 and 1991," it states.[2]

"He has both published and lectured broadly on military affairs, European security issues, the Gulf War, and leadership throughout the United States and over twelve countries. He has been a visiting fellow at the Center for International Affairs, Harvard University; Conflict Studies Research Center, Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst; Stiftung Wissenshaft und Politk, Ebenhausen, Germany; George C. Marshall Center for European Security Studies, Garmisch, Germany; and the International Institute for Strategic Studies, London. Dr. McCausland is an adjunct fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) and the RAND Corporation in Washington. He also serves on the Board of Advisers to the National Committee on American Foreign Policy in New York and the Global Strategy Institute at CSIS."

"He also serves as a national security consultant to CBS television and radio. He has been a frequent commentator on the war in Iraq and Afghanistan for CBS since early 2003. Dr. McCausland has also appeared on MSNBC, CSPAN, CNN, and the CBS Morning Show as well as being interviewed by the New York Times, Christian Science Monitor, Wall Street Journal, and Boston Globe," the biographical note states.[2]

The Pentagon's military analyst program

In April 2008 documents obtained by New York Times reporter David Barstow reported that McCausland had been recruited as one of over 75 retired military officers involved in the Pentagon military analyst program. Participants appeared on television and radio news shows as military analysts, and/or penned newspaper op/ed columns. The program was launched in early 2002 by then-Assistant Secretary of Defense for Public Affairs Victoria Clarke. The idea was to recruit "key influentials" to help sell a wary public on "a possible Iraq invasion." The program ended in 2008. [1]

Lobbying

The U.S. Senate Office of Public Records lists McCausland on the following lobbying contracts (note that dollar amounts given may be for contract that include other lobbyists), when he was a lobbyist working with the firm Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney: [3]

  • For Al-Najat, lobbying the U.S. Senate, House, and Defense and Commerce Departments for "contract procurement in Iraq" in 2003;
  • For Blue Lake Crane, "providing assistance in marketing services to the Defense Department," lobbying the U.S. Senate, House, and Defense Department in 2007 and 2008;
  • For Cross VetPharm, lobbying on "government procurement / Coalition Provisional Authority" issues in 2004;
  • For Educational Testing Service, lobbying the Commerce and State Departments and the House Foreign Affairs Committee on "business development in the Middle East" in 2004;
  • For Gemini Consulting, lobbying the Commerce and State Departments on "healthcare development in the Middle East" in 2004 and 2005;
  • For Integic Corp., lobbying the U.S. Senate, House, Defense Department and Central Intelligence Agency on "national defense" issues in 2003;
  • For Nika Technologies, lobbying the U.S. House and Senate for "exposure to business opportunities with the federal government" in 2006;
  • For Securewest International, lobbying on "private security contracting issues in Iraq" in 2004;
  • For Team Wendy, lobbying the U.S. Senate, House and Defense Department on "appropriations and defense policy" in 2007 and 2008; and
  • For WHAM TECH, lobbying the U.S. Senate and House on "Department of Defense acquisition of database software" in 2006 and 2007.


SourceWatch resources

External links

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 David Barstow, "Behind Analysts, the Pentagon’s Hidden Hand," New York Times, April 20, 2008.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs, "Jeffrey D. McCausland: Carnegie Council Senior Fellow", March 6, 2008.
  3. Senate Office of Public Records online database, accessed April 2008.

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