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Leah Vukmir

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Wisconsin State Senator Leah Vukmir

Leah Vukmir is the assistant majority leader of the Wisconsin State Senate, representing the state's fifth district. Vukmir was the National Chair of the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) in 2016 and sits on ALEC's Board of Directors as of July 2017. Vukmir was first elected to the Wisconsin State Assembly in 2002 before being elected to the State Senate in 2010.

Sen. Vukmir is Chairman of the Health and Human Services Committee and Vice Chair of the Judiciary and Public Safety Committee. Her other assignments include the Joint Finance Committee, Joint Legislative Organization Committee, Education Committee, Senate Organization Committee, and Finance Committee.[1]

2018 U.S. Senate Campaign

Vukmir Sends Fundraising Email Expressing Support of Trump Agenda

Stand With President Trump

In Sept. 2017 Vukmir sent out a fundraising petition embracing President Donald Trump and his agenda. The email stated,

"Plenty of time has passed, but still, we have no Obamacare repeal, no tax reform, and they haven't even started on building the wall. President Trump needs help from those who will not back down, who will be tenacious, who will achieve what they said they would. I can promise you, fname, [sic] when I get to Washington, conservative change WILL happen. I will stand with President Trump to get Wisconsinites -- and all Americans -- the policies they voted for."

Vukmir Announces Campaign Steering Committee

On September 18, 2017, Vukmir announced the members of her steering committee for her campaign to unseat Sen. Tammy Baldwin in 2018.[2]

The members of the committee are:

  • Ave Bie, Public Service Commission Chairwoman
  • Margaret Farrow, Former Lt. Governor
  • Scott Fitzgerald, State Senate Majority Leader
  • Michael Grebe, Chairman of the Board at the Bradley Impact Fund and former Bradley Foundation Chairman
  • Mary Kohler, GOP donor
  • Sue Lynch., former National Federation of Republican Women President
  • Barbara Lyons, former Wisconsin Right to Life Executive Director
  • Sandra Mills, Mills Supply Co. executive
  • Gerard Randall, Milwaukee Education Partnership Executive Director
  • Donald Taylor, former Rexnord Corp. executive
  • Jim Troupis, former Dane County Circuit Judge
  • Jackie Trudell, former Wisconsin Federation of Republican Women President
  • Jerry Whitburn, University of Wisconsin System Regent

Vukmir previously announced that billionaire Diane Hendricks will serve as her finance co-chair in August.[3]

Vukmir Announces Run for U.S. Senate

The Wisconsin Way

On September 8, 2017, Vukmir formally announced her run for U.S. Senate. Vukmir will first face off in the Republican party against Marine veteran Kevin Nicholson.[4] Nicholson's Super PAC, Solutions for Wisconsin, has already raised $3.5 million from GOP mega-donor Richard Uihlein.[5]

If she wins, she will challenge incumbent Sen. Tammy Baldwin (D).

Vukmir Wins 2018 Senate Straw Poll

Leah Vukmir is "seriously considering" running for the United States Senate against Democrat Tammy Baldwin in 2018, AP reports.[6] In May 2017, Vukmir won the Wispolitics.com straw poll of potential 2018 Senate candidates with 47 percent of the vote.

Ties to ALEC

About ALEC
ALEC is a corporate bill mill. It is not just a lobby or a front group; it is much more powerful than that. Through ALEC, corporations hand state legislators their wishlists to benefit their bottom line. Corporations fund almost all of ALEC's operations. They pay for a seat on ALEC task forces where corporate lobbyists and special interest reps vote with elected officials to approve “model” bills. Learn more at the Center for Media and Democracy's ALECexposed.org, and check out breaking news on our PRWatch.org site.

ALEC Leader in Wisconsin

ALEC's 2017 Iron Lady, ALEC 44th Annual Meeting in Denver, CO

Sen. Leah Vukmir received the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) Award for "Legislator of the Year" in 2009,[7] was appointed to the ALEC National Board of Directors in 2012,[8] and was named ALEC National Chair in July 2015.[9] Her ALEC awards and titles include:

  • 2017 ALEC Iron Lady
  • 2017 Chair of ALEC's Center to Protect Free Speech
  • 2016 ALEC National Chair
  • 2015 1st Vice Chair of ALEC
  • 2014 2nd Vice Chair of ALEC
  • 2013 Appointed to the National Board and Executive Committee of ALEC (Treasurer)
  • 2010-2012 ALEC Health and Human Services Task Force Chair
  • 2009 ALEC National Legislator of the Year

Vukmir has frequently "authored" and introduced ALEC legislation in Wisconsin.

ALEC Center to Protect Free Speech

In February 2017, Leah Vukmir announced the creation of the "ALEC Center to Protect Free Speech," which she also chairs.[10] One of only four ALEC policy centers, this one primarily appears to be involved in shutting down student protest and shielding the identities of wealthy campaign finance givers like the billionaire Koch brothers in the name of the First Amendment. (Koch Industries has served on the ALEC private sector board for decades.)

2016 ALEC National Chair

Sen. Vukmir was named ALEC's National Chair on July 24, 2015.[9]

Known ALEC Bills Sponsored by Vukmir

View CMD's catalog of ALEC bills at ALECExposed.org.

Center for Media and Democracy Open Records Lawsuit Against Vukmir

On June 6, 2013, the Center for Media and Democracy (CMD), publishers of SourceWatch, filed suit against Sen. Vukmir over her failure to disclose ALEC-related materials under Wisconsin's public records law. CMD discovered that ALEC started stamping its materials with a disclaimer asserting, "Because this is an internal ALEC document, ALEC believes it is not subject to disclosure under any state Freedom of Information or Public Records Act." There is no provision in Wisconsin law allowing private organizations to declare themselves immune from the state's sunshine-in-government statutes.[7]

After Senator Vukmir's staffers made headlines by berating and chasing CMD's process server,[11] Attorney General J.B. Van Hollen's office took the unprecedented step of asserting that Vukmir is entirely immune from civil suit and her obligations under the open records law based on a novel reading of the Wisconsin Constitution. This legal argument, if it were upheld, would undermine the public records law, since legislators could never be held accountable for their failure to comply with their duties under the law. Van Hollen faced heavy criticism for trying to apply the constitutional protection to the entire two-year session a legislator is in office.[12]

On March 28, 2014, Senator Vukmir agreed to turn over the documents and $15,000, paid for by the state in a settlement with CMD. "As part of the settlement, Vukmir acknowledged that the ALEC confidentiality disclaimer has no force of law in Wisconsin, and that records located in personal emails or online drop boxes are subject to the open records law," reported the Wisconsin State Journal.[13]

Documents Further Undermine Claims that ALEC Is Legislator-Driven

As CMD reported in April 2014, "the previously-undisclosed records from ALEC's Spring 2013 meeting show a Florida-based State Policy Network (SPN) lobbying group instructing Senator Vukmir and other legislators to introduce a 'model' resolution for legislators to thwart Medicaid expansion in their state, and even writing an entire 'script' for legislators to parrot in the ALEC task force meeting -- contradicting ALEC's claims to reporters last year that only legislators propose model policy, and demonstrating that such claims are merely a talking point."[14]

In advance of ALEC's 2013 Task Force Summit, Christie Herrera, vice-president of policy at the Florida-based SPN affiliate Foundation for Government Accountability, asked Vukmir to sponsor a resolution opposing Medicaid expansion. She sent Vukmir a draft of the resolution, but acknowledged "it may be tweaked a bit, based on SPN member suggestions." Herrera then wrote to Vukmir and other legislators thanking them for sponsoring the resolution, and providing specific instructions about what to say: "Each of you will need to introduce the bill," Herrera wrote. "As such I have written opening remarks that are also attached to this e-mail."[14]

The remarks were more than mere talking points. Herrera wrote an entire script for legislators to parrot. She wrote that "ALEC had a (ridiculous) concern that the task force debate would be 'one-sided,' so I have focused each of your remarks on addressing at least one pro-expansion talking point" -- yet all the remarks ultimately urged the corporate lobbyists and legislators in attendance to adopt the resolution. Vukmir did not plan to attend the task force meeting where the resolution was considered, but other records show her sending a text message asking how it went. Herrera responded: "Passed unanimously. Great job Madame Sponsor!"[14]

Vukmir and ALEC Open Records

After its successful 2013 lawsuit asking State Senator Leah Vukmir to respond to our open records requests related to ALEC, the Center for Media and Democracy continued to make regular inquiries of Vukmir and many other ALEC leaders for ALEC related materials. The following documents were obtained by CMD through open records requests with Sen. Leah Vukmir’s Wisconsin office. In its requests, CMD asked for all records that pertain to the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), American City County Exchange (ACCE), and ALEC's new lobbying arm called the Jeffersonian Project.

2017

2016

2015 pt. 1

2015 pt.2

Wisconsin Legislature: 2002-Present

Leah Vukmir was elected to the Wisconsin State Assembly in 2002, replacing Scott Walker, who became Milwaukee County Executive after winning a special election. In 2010, Vukmir was elected to the Wisconsin State Senate, defeating Democrat Jim Sullivan 53 percent to 47 percent in Wisconsin's 5th district. The race was characterized by an influx of out-of-district contributions and outside spending. At $1.56 million, the 5th District was the most expensive legislative race in 2010.

"The candidates spent $692,142 and smear groups spent an estimated $864,192. Vukmir and Sullivan were also the top spending legislative candidates in 2010. Vukmir lead with $408,053 followed by Sullivan who spent $284,089," according to the Wisconsin Democracy Campaign.[15] Bruce Murphy of Urban Milwaukee noted that the vast majority of her political contributions came from outside her district.[16]

Vukmir Attacked Non-Partisan Government Accountability Board and CMD

In October 2015, as Wisconsin Republicans moved to fast-track bills intended to dismantle Wisconsin's nonpartisan Government Accountability Board (GAB) and gut the state's campaign finance laws, Vukmir made a series of false claims to paint the GAB as inept and partisan. She claimed that the GAB had failed to investigate CMD for not abiding by lobby disclosure laws, when in fact CMD does no lobbying in Wisconsin. The charges were especially egregious as Vukmir was the highest-ranking legislative official in the Koch-funded American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), a group that has demonstrably lobbied in Wisconsin and in other states, but has never registered as a lobbyist in Wisconsin.

The GAB was created in 2007 as the nation's first nonpartisan elections and ethics watchdog. It was directed by a board of retired judges. Sen. Vukmir voted for the creation of the GAB, but the agency fell into Republican cross hairs because it helped investigate serious allegations of illegal coordination between Governor Scott Walker's campaign and outside groups during the 2011-2012 recall elections.[17]

See CMD's response to Sen. Vukmir's allegations here.

Gov. Walker, Sen. Vukmir and GOP Legislature Dismantle GAB

In 2016, the GAB was gutted by Gov. Walker and the Republican-controlled legislature and replaced with the Wisconsin Ethics Commission. In 2015, Mary Bottari reported, "The changes will put the independent board firmly under the control of partisans. These changes include: getting rid of Kevin Kennedy, the director and general counsel, and Jonathan Becker, who runs the ethics and lobbying division; splitting the GAB into two agencies; getting rid of all the retired judges on the board and replacing them with an even number of partisan appointees, a recipe for partisan gridlock; changing the rules so that the GAB cannot investigate on its own and must come back for approval from the legislature; and creating bright lines for referrals to District Attorneys. Plus the GAB would no longer have a sum-sufficient budget for investigations. GAB would have to go hat in hand to the very people it might be investigating in the legislature."[18]

ALEC Center to Protect Free Speech

Shielding Wealthy Donor Identities

According to ALEC, the Center to Protect Free Speech focuses on three issues: "donor privacy", "campus speech", and "commercial speech".[19]

Vukmir is a proponent of ALEC's national push to allow campaign donors to hide their identity.

Suppressing Dissent on Campus

In April 2017, Republican Wisconsin State Assembly member Jesse Kremer authored the "Campus Free Speech Act," a bill aimed at penalizing student protesters and shutting down dissent against speakers on university campuses. According to the Associated Press, "Under the bill, complaints from any two people about the conduct of a student in the University of Wisconsin system during a speech or presentation would trigger a hearing before a new Council on Free Expression. Students found to have twice engaged in violence or disorderly conduct that disrupts another person's freedom of expression would be suspended for a semester. A third offense would mean expulsion."

Democrats warned that the legislation could actually be used to chill free speech, the very right that the bill purports to protect, arguing that students with a partisan agenda could work in pairs to quickly file the requisite two complaints against anyone they may disagree with.[20]

Vukmir authored a competing campus speech bill in the Senate that "would also apply to the state's technical colleges and would go as far as prohibiting students from organizing protests that could dissuade speakers from visiting," according to the Associated Press.[21]

Vukmir's bill is based off of a model bill by the right-wing Goldwater Institute.[22]

Fighting For Lower Wages

Wisconsin Passed ALEC "Right to Work" Bill

In February 2015, Governor Walker and the Republican-controlled legislature pushed through a private sector right-to-work bill over the objections of thousands of workers and 450 construction firms rallying against the bill. CMD exposed the bill as a verbatim ALEC measure, authored by ALEC members in the legislature, including Vukmir.[23]

Vukmir Introduced ALEC-Inspired Prevailing Wage Repeal

In February 2015, shortly after the passage of Right to Work in Wisconsin, Vukmir introduced another wage-crushing measure, SB 49, an ALEC-inspired bill repealing the state's prevailing wage law for local projects. Since many state contracting laws encourage or require public authorities to select the low bidder, prevailing wage laws are an essential backstop in preventing a public contracting "race to the bottom." Prevailing wage laws do not prevent non-union companies from bidding on public contracts or in any way favor unionized companies over non-union ones. But they do prevent companies from winning public construction contracts merely on the basis of paying low wages. Prevailing wage repeal, according to Marquette University Law Professor Paul Secunda, "is just another way in the building industry to get cheap labor."[24]

The Kochs' Americans for Prosperity touted dubious economic research to show massive savings from repealing the prevailing wage, but studies have consistently found that prevailing wage laws do not increase government contracting costs, and repeal of prevailing wage laws does not save taxpayer money, primarily because higher-wage construction workers are much more productive. An exhaustive study using a database of 150,000 construction projects over the period 2003-2010 compared the eight Midwestern states with prevailing wage laws to the four without and found per-square-foot construction costs to be equal or lower in prevailing wage states.[25] They found no taxpayer savings associated with the absence of a prevailing wage law. Meanwhile, cost in terms of lost wages, benefits, and lower tax payments is real. In nine states that repealed prevailing wage laws in the 1970s and 1980s, construction worker wages fell by an average of nearly $1,500 per year, according to another study.[24][26]

In April 2017, Vukmir introduced legislation to repeal the prevailing wage law for state-funded public works projects. The Koch-backed Concerned Veterans for America launched an ad in support of Vukmir's effort to remove a minimum pay requirement on state construction projects.

Vukmir "Authored" ALEC Bill Prohibiting Project Labor Agreements

Sen. Vukmir co-authored a bill prohibiting project labor agreements in December 2016. The bill was called out as an ALEC "model bill".[27]

Crime

Vukmir Bill Would Increase Youth Incarceration at Juvenile Detention Facility Under FBI Investigation

Along with Republican Joe Sanfelippo, Sen. Vukmir introduced the Victim Prevention Package on February 2, 2017, a bundle of bills that would expand the list of crimes that would land a juvenile in the state's youth prison and remove the three year sentencing limit. "Beyond increasing the number of offenses that could label teens as 'serious juvenile offenders' and removing the current three-year cap on juvenile detention, the package also calls for increased mandatory minimum sentencing, and tougher penalties for carjacking and possessing a firearm while on probation," Wisconsin Public Radio reported.[28]

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported that the Department of Corrections launched a probe into Lincoln Hills, the state's youth incarceration facility, in 2014. "The sweeping criminal probe, now nearly 2 years old, is examining allegations of prisoner abuse, child neglect, sexual assault, intimidation of witnesses and victims, strangulation and tampering with public records. A separate internal investigation uncovered four incidents where inmates' bones were broken."[29]

Lincoln Hills is under investigation by the FBI and also faces a lawsuit filed by the ACLU alleging that the children's constitutional rights have been violated, as of January 2017. Per WPR, the lawsuit asserts that "as much as 20 percent of the population is held in solitary confinement and guards needlessly pepper spray prisoners."[30]

Restricting Voting Rights

Ex-GOP Staffer: Vukmir "Politically Frothing at the Mouth" over Voter ID Law

In 2011, Act 23 established voter ID in Wisconsin, an ALEC-inspired bill pushed through the legislature by the Republican majority and signed into law by ALEC alumnus Scott Walker. A number of lawsuits were filed over the measure, claiming voter suppression.

A May 2016 challenge to the restrictive law began with testimony from Todd Allbaugh, former chief of staff to Republican Dale Schultz. According to Allbaugh, Vukmir was "politically frothing at the mouth" at the prospect of Voter ID benefiting the Republican party. "I've characterized it as giddy and that's part of what bothered me so much," Allbaugh testified.[31]

It has been estimated that Wisconsin's voter ID bill decreased state turnout by as many as 200,000 votes in the 2016 election. Republican Donald Trump won the state by 22,748 votes.[32]

Wisconsin Gerrymandering Case

On November 21, 2016, the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Wisconsin struck down hyper-partisan legislative redistricting maps in Whitford v. Gill, declaring them to be "an unconstitutional political gerrymander." The maps were drawn in secret in 2011 by a Republican legislature that controlled both houses and the governorship. The ruling was unprecedented and "truly historic," Milwaukee attorney Peter Earle said. "It provides voters with an opportunity to fix a cancer growing on our democracy. It means that all political parties have the chance to be treated equally and have the value of their vote protected under the Equal Protection Clause of the U.S. Constitution."[33]

According to the court's opinion, Vukmir provided specific suggestions on how Republicans could carve nearby districts to flip them from blue to red. "During the drafting process, [Scott Fitzgerald aide Tad] Ottman met with individual senators to review with them the census numbers for their district, to verify their addresses, and to ask general questions about their districts, such as 'are there areas you like, are there areas you don't like, are there areas surrounding your district that you like.' Id. at 81. Ottman also received a few requests from Senators concerning their districts. Senator Vukmir provided specific suggestions on how her district could be re-drawn to take the seat away from a Democratic member of the Assembly: 'If you need a way to take the Staskunas seat, put a little bit of my Senate seat into New Berlin (2–3 wards could make that a GOP Assembly seat).' Tr. Ex. 239. However, because Senator Vukmir's district encompassed Milwaukee, the drafters could not implement the suggestion because 'there was simply less flexibility in how [they] could draw that district than in some other areas of the state.' R.148 at 82."[34]

The case is being appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court as of July 2017.[35]

Leader in Push to Privatize Public Education

Vukmir is an advocate for taxpayer-funded vouchers for private and religious schools.

Vukmir Introduced ALEC's Special Needs Scholarship Program Act

Sen. Vukmir and fellow ALEC member Rep. Michelle Litjens introduced AB 110, the Special Needs Scholarship Program Act, modeled on the ALEC bill of the same name. The bill, which did not pass, was subject to a hearing in which legislative supporters visibly ignored the concerns being raised about the bill. The Wisconsin Department of Public Education objected to the bill in the strongest terms: "It strips special education students of due process rights and rights to services. It allows for the segregation of students based on disability. It will devastate funding for public education in select districts. It will result in the largest expansion of private school regulation ever seen in Wisconsin and, at the end of the day, no one will have any data to show if it resulted in a better education."[36] 

Criminalizing Poverty

Vukmir Supports Gov. Walker Push to Drug-Test Medicaid Recipients

In 2017, Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker indicated that he wanted the state to be the first in the nation to mandate drug testing for childless adults applying for Medicaid benefits. Vukmir defended the draconian measure after it passed through the state legislature: "We know what to do. We know how to take care of our own."[37]

The New York Times wrote in a May 31, 2017 editorial, "Mandatory drug testing for Medicaid enrollment would affect an estimated 148,000 of the 1.2 million people receiving state health care support. They are either totally impoverished or members of the working poor earning less than $12,060 a year. Refusal to be tested would result in denial of health care for six months, with repeated confrontations likely to follow. If the governor succeeds in appealing to the (Trump) administration for permission to carry out his scheme, other conservative states will most likely consider the step. Jon Peacock, research director of the Wisconsin Council on Children and Families, warns that such a trend would be 'an extremely negative development because it treats drug addiction as a moral failing rather than a disease.'"[38]

Fighting Against Women's Reproductive Rights

Vukmir Co-Sponsored Extreme 20 Week Abortion Ban

In 2015, Vukmir co-sponsored an extreme ban on abortions after 20 weeks. The bill included no exception for rape or incest. Republican supporters of the bill justified it by claiming the fetus feels pain after 20 weeks, but both the American Medical Association and the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists refuted the Republican talking point. Both organizations, comprised of practicing physicians and other medical professionals, concluded that the actual evidence suggests that it is not possible for the fetus to feel pain until the third trimester, which begins at 27 weeks.[39] Governor Scott Walker signed the strict ban into law on July 20, 2015.[39]

Prohibiting Research on Fetal Tissue

Vukmir is one of eight Republican co-sponsors of a bill that would ban research using aborted fetal tissue in Wisconsin, reports the Wisconsin State Journal. The legislation is supported by a number of right-wing special interest groups, including Wisconsin Right to Life, Pro-Life Wisconsin, Wisconsin Family Action, and Wisconsin Catholic Conference.[40]

Opponents of the legislation argue that the ban would negatively affect life-saving research already regulated by the federal government. "The bill would reach into labs and end ongoing, pioneering research on heart disease, cancer, infectious disease, and neurological and developmental disorders," says Cures for Tomorrow, a coalition of academic research institutions, bioscience-related trade groups, and health care providers. "The ban would be devastating to the remarkable opportunity we have to develop new, lifesaving vaccines, therapies and cures that will benefit patients across Wisconsin."[40]

Opposition to Emergency Contraceptive for Rape Victims

In 2007, Vukmir voted against the Compassionate Care for Rape Victims Act, a bill that required Wisconsin hospital emergency rooms to provide rape victims with information regarding emergency contraception and dispense it if requested.[41][42]

The bill was passed with bi-partisan support. The pro-life organizations Wisconsin Right to Life and the Wisconsin Catholic Conference took a "neutral" position on the bill.[41]

Banning Birth Control on Campus

In 2005, the Wisconsin Assembly passed a bill prohibiting University of Wisconsin System health centers from advertising, prescribing, or dispensing emergency contraception. The bill, which ultimately failed to become law, would have made Wisconsin the first state in the nation to ban emergency contraceptives on state college campuses.

Rep. Vukmir supported the legislation. Marlin Schneider, D-Wisconsin Rapids, called the measure "a direct frontal assault on the right to privacy, on the right of free speech, on the right of a free press... Apparently some in this body want to take us back to the time when the dispensing of contraception was a criminal act." Vukmir countered, "The university should not be in the business of dispensing a pill that encourages irresponsible sex and undermines parents' message of abstinence." Opponents argued that the bill would harm rape victims and would likely lead to an increase in abortions.[43]

Vukmir, a Former Nurse, Fought Healthcare Initiatives

Derailing Universal Healthcare in Wisconsin With ALEC-Inspired Health Savings Accounts

Vukmir opposed the "Healthy Wisconsin Initiative", a 2007 push to create a state-run health care system for Wisconsin. According to Luke Fuller, Vukmir's former chief of staff, Vukmir often cites "stopping Healthy Wisconsin" as her proudest legislative achievement.[44]

Vukmir introduced the competing "Patients First", an ALEC-inspired initiative promoting coverage plans with tax advantages for money put into Health Savings Accounts. According to the Commonwealth Fund, a private foundation that promotes better quality and access to healthcare in the United States, Health Savings Accounts are not likely to reduce costs, improve quality, or dramatically increase the number of insured Americans.[45]

Before the U.S. Senate Finance Committee's Subcommittee on Health in 2006, the Commonwealth Fund testified that Health Savings Accounts were likely to worsen problems in the United States health care system, not improve them: "But while it is comforting to believe that such a simple idea could help solve our health care problems, nearly all evidence gathered to date about HSAs and HDHPs points to the contrary. Indeed, there is evidence that encouraging people to join such health plans will exacerbate some of the very maladies that undermine our health care system's ability to perform at its highest level."[45]

Only a small part of Vukmir's plan was adopted, but the "Healthy Wisconsin" plan failed. During the next election, Republicans took control of the Governor's mansion as well as both chambers of the legislature.

Opposition to Mental Health Parity Act

Vukmir opposed the Mental Health Parity Act, legislation requiring "insurance companies to cover mental health and substance abuse treatment. The bill was passed on a bipartisan 57-40 vote and with the support of a wide range of groups, including Aurora Health Care, the Marshfield Clinic, the Medical College of Wisconsin, the Wisconsin Catholic Conference, the Wisconsin Medical Society, the Wisconsin Council of Churches and the Coalition of Wisconsin Aging Groups," Louis Fortis and Lisa Kaiser reported in 2010.[41]

A number of Republicans supported the measure. "[F]ormer Republican state Senate Majority Leader Mary Panzer is a longtime mental health parity advocate because, as she told the Shepherd in an interview when the Legislature was debating the issue, 'When you look at the costs that society pays, that the taxpayer pays, by not covering these illnesses, it's huge.' Forcing those with a mental illness into a public-pay program like Medicaid doesn't save money, either, because Medicaid reimburses at a very low rate. 'It is a pass-through on everybody else's hospital bills, clinic bills and doctor's bills,' Panzer explained."[41]

Vukmir Booed After Accusing Democrats of Using Cancer Patients as "Shield" to Further Marijuana Legalization

Leah Vukmir Booed at Wisconsin medical marijuana hearing.

During a December 15, 2009 medical marijuana hearing, Vukmir elicited a chorus of boo's after the Senator accused Democrat Senators Mark Pocan and Jon Erpenbach of using cancer patients to further what she perceived as a marijuana legalization agenda: "What I think that I resent most is this facade that you are putting forth, using people who are dying of cancer, who have other illnesses, as your shield. And I think it is nothing more than a ruse for you to move toward full legalization of marijuana. And I wish you would just come right out and admit that." Vukmir went on to argue that there is no medical use for marijuana.

Cochlear Implants

As reported by the Sheppard Express, "Vukmir opposed a bill that requires insurance companies to cover cochlear implants or other hearing devices for children with severely limited hearing. The devices typically cost around $50,000 out of pocket. State Rep. David Cullen, a moderate Democrat who represents Milwaukee’s West Side and West Milwaukee, voted for the bill, saying it would 'allow children to keep their hearing, to become members of society, to go to school and keep a job.' But Vukmir, a former pediatric nurse... argued to her fellow Assembly members that 'You're voting to take away insurance for employees who work for small businesses.' Although WMC (Wisconsin Manufacturers and Commerce) sided with Vukmir, few of her Republican colleagues supported her. The bill passed the Assembly on a bipartisan 80-16 vote and was signed into law."[41]

Opposition to Indoor Smoking Ban

On July 5, 2010, Wisconsin's smoke-free workplace law took effect, making all workplaces -- including bars, restaurants, and hotels -- smoke-free indoors. Rep. Vukmir voted against the ban and branded it as "anti-smoking zealotry... The only thing that's compromised are individual rights and individual freedoms."[46]

Pushing ALEC-Inspired Tax Cuts

Repeal of Combined Reporting Law

In 2010, Vukmir called a special session of the legislature to repeal the state's combined reporting law, a law that closes what is known as the "Las Vegas Loophole." Repealing the measure would allow a corporation to dodge its tax obligation with one state by reporting it as income in another state. Vukmir claimed that the combined reporting law led to cuts at Harley Davidson, although the company stated that its financial difficulties were unrelated, and she blamed the law for Polaris' move to Minnesota, even though that state also has a combined reporting law.[47]

Vukmir's attempt to repeal Wisconsin's combined reporting law is in lockstep with the American Legislative Exchange Council's agenda. ALEC has a model bill titled A Resolution In Opposition To Mandatory Unitary Combined Reporting.

Taxpayer Bill of Rights (TABOR)

Senator Vukmir introduced the Taxpayer Bill of Rights despite widespread opposition, even within her own party. The measure ultimately failed to move through the Republican-controlled legislature.[41]

Vukmir is an Advisory Member of GOPAC

Vukmir sits on the Advisory Board of GOPAC, a 527 organization that pushes far-right policy and supports emerging Republican candidates for statewide office. GOPAC was founded in 1978 in "an effort to build a farm team of Republican officeholders who could then run for Congress or higher state offices later."[48]

Vukmir Worked for Right-Wing Wisconsin Policy Research Institute

From 1999 to 2002, Vukmir was a Kohler Research Fellow for the right-wing Wisconsin Policy Research Institute (WPRI). Vukmir describes her work with PRESS (see below) as "a WPRI project committed to raising academic standards by increasing parental awareness and involvement in the school reform process."

WPRI is heavily funded by the Milwaukee-based Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation and is a member of the State Policy Network (SPN).

Vukmir Co-Founded Pro-Voucher Group PRESS

In 1994, Vukmir co-founded Parents Raising Educational Standards in Schools (PRESS), "an early scouting party on the mission to expand school choice statewide. Matt Hrody reported for Milwaukee Magazine, "As its president, Vukmir penned a number of columns for the PRESS website... One of the last, from 1999, blames the Columbine shooting, in part, on 'the self-esteem movement.' She writes that because of 'coddling' and 'our attempt to protect our youth from pain and sorrow, we are actually ensuring that they will be absorbed by their own self-pity. It is under these circumstances that a despondent teen may find no other recourse but to lose control and act out violently... I fear another Columbine is inevitable...' As early as 1997, Vukmir and PRESS were calling for the removal of the income cap in Milwaukee that prevented more affluent families from participating [in the state's school voucher program], something that could have benefited her financially and still hasn't happened, although Walker relaxed the cap somewhat in the 2011 state budget."[44]

Contact Information

Madison Office
Room 415 South, State Capitol Building
Madison, WI 53707
Phone: (608).266.2512
Fax: (608).267.0367
District Phone: (414).453.0024
Email: Sen.Vukmir@legis.wisconsin.gov
Website: http://legis.wisconsin.gov/senate/05/vukmir/
Twitter: @LeahVukmir
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/leahvukmir/
ALEC: https://www.alec.org/person/sen-leah-vukmir/

References

  1. Wisconsin State Legislature, Senator Leah Vukmir, state governmental website, accessed February 22, 2017.
  2. Patrick Marley, Leah Vukmir announces backers in U.S. Senate bid, Journal Sentinel, September 18, 2017.
  3. Bill Glauber and Daniel Bice, Leah Vukmir, Kevin Nicholson land key endorsements in GOP contest for U.S. Senate, Journal Sentinel, August 15, 2017.
  4. Wisconsin Public Television, Vukmir Announces Run Against Baldwin, Wisconsin Public Television, September 8, 2017.
  5. Bill Glauber, Super PAC backing Kevin Nicholson raises additional $1.5 million in race against Tammy Baldwin, Journal Sentinel, July 13, 2017.
  6. GOP state Sen. Leah Vukmir says she’s ‘seriously considering’ U.S. Senate run, Associated Press, February 16, 2017.
  7. 7.0 7.1 Brendan Fischer, CMD Files Open Records Suit Against ALEC Board Member Sen. Leah Vukmir, PRWatch.org, June 7, 2013.
  8. American Legislative Exchange Council, ALEC Board of Directors, organizational website, accessed November 26, 2012.
  9. 9.0 9.1 State Senator Leah Vukmir named ALEC National Chair, CBS 58, July 24, 2015.
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