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Pedro Nikken

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Dr. Nikken "is a former Judge and President of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights. His expertise within the area of Human Rights is extensive. In 1990 he was appointed as Legal Advisor to the UN Secretary General on El Salvador’s peace process; this was followed by his appointment as a UN Independent Expert to assist El Salvador on Human Rights. He was also part of the UN Special Envoy to Burundi on the establishment of a Truth Commission / International Judicial Commission of Inquiry.

"Dr. Nikken also has extensive experience within the public sector and governmental affairs. From 1969 to 1971 he served as Assistant to the Deputy Minister for Foreign Affairs of Venezuela and Advisor to the Minister for Foreign Affairs of Venezuela from 1979 to 1984. He was also an advisor to the Legislative Committee of the Venezuelan National Congress and as an Alternate Judge, Political Administrative Chamber, Supreme Court of Justice.

"Dr. Nikken is a Founder, Board Member and currently Permanent Counselor of the Inter-American Institute of Human Rights and has served in the capacity of President and Vice-President. He is currently Emeritus Professor of Civil and International Law at the Universidad Central de Venezuela. Prior to this appointment he served a Director of the Law School and General Director and Dean of the Juridical and Political Sciences Faculty at this same institution." [1]

With regard to the recent 2006 elections in Venezuela he noted: ""There has been an excessive use of state resources to favor the president," said Pedro Nikken, one of five directors of Electoral Eye, a watchdog group that has otherwise found an audit of voting machines adequate." [2]

Also see: "Ojo Electoral, a civic organization that includes both opposition and pro-government members, allocates shared blame between the government and opposition for mistrust in the electorate. Nonetheless, Pedro Nikken, one of its five directors, summarized the consensus in the group as follows: “Mere suspicions or the appearance of inconsistencies or certain imperfections in with [sic] respect these dictates are insufficient to justify a call for abstention from elections.”" [3]

External links

  • "Biography", International Justice Project, Accessed December 2006.