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American concentration camps

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On January 24, 2006, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's (DHS) U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) component awarded an Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) contingency contract to Halliburton subsidiary Kellogg Brown and Root (KBR) to "support ICE facilities in the event of an emergency"—in essence, American concentration camps—Business Wire reported.

"With a maximum total value of $385 million over a five-year term, consisting of a one-year based period and four one-year options, the competitively awarded contract will be executed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Fort Worth District. KBR held the previous ICE contract from 2000 through 2005." [1]

"The contract, which [was] effective immediately, provides for establishing temporary detention and processing capabilities to augment existing ICE Detention and Removal Operations (DRO) Program facilities in the event of an emergency influx of immigrants into the U.S., or to support the rapid development of new programs. The contingency support contract provides for planning and, if required, initiation of specific engineering, construction and logistics support tasks to establish, operate and maintain one or more expansion facilities.

"The contract may also provide migrant detention support to other U.S. Government organizations in the event of an immigration emergency, as well as the development of a plan to react to a national emergency, such as a natural disaster. In the event of a natural disaster, the contractor could be tasked with providing housing for ICE personnel performing law enforcement functions in support of relief efforts," Business Wire wrote.

Construction 2006

KBR is constructing "a huge facility at an undisclosed location to hold tens of thousands of Bush's 'unlawful enemy combatants,'" Marjorie Cohn wrote in AlterNet, October 9, 2006. "Americans are certain to be among them."

The Military Commissions Act of 2006, passed September 29, 2006, "provides the basis for the President to round-up both aliens and U.S. citizens he determines have given material support to terrorists," Cohn wrote.

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