Carnegie Commission on Preventing Deadly Conflict

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The Carnegie Commission on Preventing Deadly Conflict The "ceased operations in December 1999. Commission reports are still available for download on this site. The Conflict Prevention Project at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars builds on the work of the Commission." [1]

"Carnegie Corporation of New York established the Carnegie Commission on Preventing Deadly Conflict in May 1994 to address the looming threat to world peace of intergroup violence and to advance new ideas for the prevention and resolution of deadly conflict. An operating program of the Corporation, the Commission is cochaired by Corporation president emeritus David A. Hamburg and Cyrus R. Vance, former U.S. secretary of state. It has a membership of sixteen eminent international leaders and scholars with long experience in conflict prevention and resolution. An Advisory Council, expert consultants, and experienced practitioners have assisted the Commission in its work.

"The Commission has examined the principal causes of deadly ethnic, nationalist, and religious conflicts within and between states and the circumstances that foster or deter their outbreak. Taking a long-term, worldwide view of violent conflicts that are likely to emerge, it seeks to determine the functional requirements of an effective system for preventing mass violence and to identify the ways in which such a system could be implemented. The Commission looks at the strengths and weaknesses of various international entities in conflict prevention and considers ways in which international organizations might contribute toward developing an effective international system of nonviolent problem solving." [2]

Members [3]

Special Advisor to the Commission

Advisory Council

(* Deceased February 1995.)

Resources and articles

References

  1. Home, Carnegie Commission on Preventing Deadly Conflict, accessed July 17, 2007.
  2. About the Commission, Carnegie Commission on Preventing Deadly Conflict, accessed July 17, 2007.
  3. Promoting Democracy in the 1990s, Carnegie, accessed July 17, 2007.