Dibutyl phthalates (DBP)

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Dibutyl phthalates (DBP) (both di-n-butyl phthalate and di-isobutyl phthalate) are among a group of chemicals known as phthalates. They are used as industrial solvents and as additives in nail polish, cosmetics, some printing inks, pharmaceutical coatings, and insecticides.[1] When exposed to DBP, humans excrete mono-n-butyl phthalate (MnBP) and mono-isobutyl phthalate (MiBP) in their urine.[2] According to the CDC: "DBP can product reproductive toxicity in male rodents."[3] The Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008 banned DBP in concentrations greater than 0.1 percent in children's toys and "child care articles" beginning February 10, 2009.[4]

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References

  1. Centers for Disease Control, Fourth National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals, Accessed August 5, 2010
  2. Centers for Disease Control, Fourth National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals, Accessed August 5, 2010
  3. Centers for Disease Control, Fourth National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals, Accessed August 5, 2010
  4. Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008, Govtrack.us, Accessed August 14, 2010.

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