Jerry Taylor

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Jerry Taylor is a senior fellow with the Cato Institute, a Washington D.C. think tank, and a climate change mitigation skeptic.

Views

Taylor said he opposes government action to mitigate climate change and believes "adaptation is a cheaper and more effective way to reduce the damages associated with anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. Mitigation will likely do more harm to human well-being than good."[1]

Education

Taylor reportedly attended the University of Iowa, majoring in political science.

Career

A biographical note on Cato's website states that Taylor has "served on several congressional advisory bodies and has testified frequently on Capitol Hill regarding various energy and environmental policy matters. He is the author or coauthor of numerous Cato policy studies addressing energy taxes, the oil market, electricity regulation, energy efficiency, renewable energy, sustainable development, and trade and the environment. He has also contributed to several anthologies, including The Concise Encyclopedia of Economics (2007), Energy & American Society – 13 Myths (2007), The Republican Revolution 10 Years Later (2005), Earth Report 2000 (2000), China as a Global Economic Power (1997), and Market Liberalism (1993)."[2]

Affiliations

Also, "Taylor is a member of the International Association for Energy Economics and has refereed articles for their publication, The Energy Journal. His is also an adjunct scholar at the Institute for Energy Research."[2]

Ties to the American Legislative Exchange Council

Jerry Taylor spoke at the 2001 ALEC Task Force Meeting in New York, NY on August 3, 2001.

About ALEC
ALEC is a corporate bill mill. It is not just a lobby or a front group; it is much more powerful than that. Through ALEC, corporations hand state legislators their wishlists to benefit their bottom line. Corporations fund almost all of ALEC's operations. They pay for a seat on ALEC task forces where corporate lobbyists and special interest reps vote with elected officials to approve “model” bills. Learn more at the Center for Media and Democracy's ALECexposed.org, and check out breaking news on our PRWatch.org site.


Articles and resources

Related SourceWatch articles

References

  1. email to ahaynes, 2011-11-01
  2. 2.0 2.1 Jerry Taylor - Cato Institute: Policy Scholars. Cato Institute. Retrieved on 2011-11-01.

External links

Exchange with Michael Tobis

  • Michael Tobis (2007-12-12). Cato Dude Replies. Only In It For The Gold. Retrieved on 2011-11-01.

Exchange re Cato ad; libertarians and climate change

"We’re accustomed to calling the “argument from authority” a fallacy, but in fact, that’s what the vast majority of us have to go on most of the time. Provided you ensure that authority’s authority actually applies to the field in question, it’s as good a strategy as any. ..."
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