Kenneth Allard

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Carl Kenneth Allard served as Special Assistant to the Army Chief of Staff (1987-90) and also was a Technical Advisor for the 1998 PBS Frontline program, "Ambush in Mogadishu." After retiring from the military, Dr. Allard became a Senior Associate at the Center for Strategic & International Studies, an adjunct professor at Georgetown University, and a military analyst for MSNBC.[1] In 1987, Col. Allard was Vice President of Potomac Strategies International, a Washington, D.C.-based lobbying and consultancy firm.[2]

Col. Allard was a member of the Pentagon military analyst program, was an NBC military analyst and taught information warfare at the National Defense University. Allard, according to the New York Times, "said the campaign amounted to a sophisticated information operation. 'This was a coherent, active policy.' ... As conditions in Iraq deteriorated, Mr. Allard recalled, he saw a yawning gap between what analysts were told in private briefings and what subsequent inquiries and books later revealed. 'Night and day,' Mr. Allard said, 'I felt we’d been hosed.'[3]

The Pentagon's military analyst program

In April, 2008 documents obtained by New York Times reporter David Barstow revealed that Allard had been recruited as one of over 75 retired military officers involved in the Pentagon military analyst program. Participants appeared on television and radio news shows as military analysts, and/or penned newspaper op/ed columns. The program was launched in early 2002 by then-Assistant Secretary of Defense for Public Affairs Victoria Clarke. The idea was to recruit "key influentials" to help sell a wary public on "a possible Iraq invasion." The article was titled, "Message Machine: Behind Analysts, the Pentagon's Hidden Hand." [4]

Pulitzer prize protest

In 2009, the New York Times article on the Pentagon's Military Analyst Program won reporter Barstow and the Times a Pulitzer Prize for investigative journalism.[5] In May, 2009, Allard protested the award to the Pulitzer Committee and the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), but not directly to the New York Times. [6][7]

Allard disputed the accuracy, completeness and even-handedness of the Times article, citing in particular the reporter's failure to mention Allard's book, Warheads: Cable News and the Fog of War, published in 2006, almost two years before to the publication of the Times article. In interviews with Allard, Barstow had indicated he had read the book closely, yet Barstow did not mention the book in the 7,800-word article. In a June 5, 2009 piece posted on RealClearPolitics.com, Allard wrote,

That book revealed how the military analysts were created after 911, not by Donald Rumsfeld but by TV networks forced to cover a war few reporters understood -- military service never having been a prerequisite for journalistic advancement. WARHEADS extensively described the Pentagon program, inviting readers to accompany me inside those E-Ring briefings and even into the Iraqi war zone. Far from being anyone's surrogates, the military analysts were strong-willed, fiercely independent and utterly defiant of party lines -- whether propounded by the Pentagon or our own networks.[8]

Allard protested that the Times story was "profoundly slanted" and "defamatory," and said Barstow's failure to discuss the book was "a deliberate omission." He further wrote, "I voluntarily testified to the Pentagon IG (Inspector General) that the wrong-doing alleged by the Times was without any foundation."[9]

The New York Times stands by the story. [10]

Lobbying

A search of the U.S. Senate Office of Public Records for "Allard, Kenneth" lists Allard on the following lobbying contracts: [11]

Books

In 2006, Allard wrote a book about his experiences as a TV military analyst, called 'Warheads: Cable News and the Fog of War.' [13]

Allard authored Somalia Operations: Lessons Learned, (National Defense Univ Press, 1995), an after-action view of the U.S. mission in Somalia.[14]

SourceWatch resources

External links

References

  1. PBS Interview: Col. Kenneth Allard (Ret.), Frontline, October 26, 2001
  2. Tufts University International Security Studies International Security Studies PhD Past to Present Research compilation 1971-2006, 2 pages at .pdf page 7, January 9, 2007
  3. David Barstow, "Behind Analysts, the Pentagon’s Hidden Hand," New York Times, April 20, 2008.
  4. David Barstow, "Behind Analysts, the Pentagon’s Hidden Hand," New York Times, April 20, 2008
  5. Pulitzer.org The 2009 Pulitzer Prize Winners Investigative Reporting, organizational website, accessed June 15, 2011
  6. Kenneth Allard Why the Pulitzer Prize Committee Should Rescind its Recent Award to the New York Times, BoycottTheNewYorkTimes.com, blog, June 8, 20090
  7. See note on discussion page about telephone conversation between Sourcewatch Editor Anne Landman and New York Times reporter David Barstow, June 20, 2011, 10:30 a.m. Mountain Daylight Time
  8. Kenneth Allard Protesting the New York Times' Pulitzer, RealClearPolitics.com (blog), June 5, 2009
  9. Kenneth Allard Protesting the New York Times' Pulitzer, RealClearPolitics.com (blog), June 5, 2009
  10. See note on discussion page about telephone conversation between Sourcewatch Editor Anne Landman and New York Times reporter David Barstow, June 20, 2011, 10:30 a.m. Mountain Daylight Time
  11. Senate Office of Public Records online database, originally accessed April 2008, and results reaffirmed on June 15, 2011. Check the box for "lobbyist" and then enter "Allard, Kenneth"
  12. Senate Office of Public Records online database, originally accessed April 2008, and results reaffirmed on June 15, 2011
  13. Allard, Kenneth (2006). Warheads: Cable News and the Fog of War. City: US Naval Institute Press. ISBN 1591140072. 
  14. PBS Interview: Col. Kenneth Allard (Ret.), Frontline, October 26, 2001

Articles

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