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Khalid Sheik Mohammad

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Khalid Sheik Mohammad is an al Qaeda suspect who has claimed responsibility for the September 11, 2001 attacks. On March 1, 2003, Mohammed was arrested in Rawalpindi, Pakistan, and transferred to U.S. custody. In September 2006, he "was among 14 prisoners identified by U.S. authorities as 'high-value' terrorism suspects and transferred" to Guantanamo from "secret CIA prisons abroad." [1][2]

Claims of terrorist acts

Khalid Sheik Mohammad "admitted a key role in 31 attacks carried out or planned by" Al Qaeda, including the following: [3]

  • "I was responsible for the 9/11 operation, from A to Z" [4]
  • "'I was the military operational commander for all foreign operations around the world,' under the leadership of Osama bin Laden, Mohammed said in a statement read to a March 10 tribunal at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, by a U.S. military officer acting as his personal representative." [5]
  • Beheading of Daniel Pearl, the Wall Street Journal reporter who was kidnapped and killed in Pakistan in 2002. [6]
  • Nightclub bombing in Bali, Indonesia. [7]
  • Attempting "to down two American airplanes using shoe bombs". [8]

Credibility of claims

"Some intelligence experts questioned the credibility Mohammed's claims to have been involved in so many plots against targets ranging from former U.S. President Jimmy Carter to London landmark Big Ben.

"Former CIA official Robert Baer said Mohammed's rambling testimony raised suspicions about his treatment at the hands of CIA interrogators.

"'Once you rough up a witness with waterboarding, they figure out what narrative you want and that's the narrative they tell. And that suspicion is always going to be out there. That's what we're left with,' Baer said," Andrew Gray reported for Reuters March 15, 2007.

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