Organochlorines

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Organochlorines (also known as Chlorinated Hydrocarbons) are a class of insecticides. The most famous organochlorine is DDT. Others include: aldrin, chlordane, dieldrin, heptachlor, hexachlorbenzene, and lindane

In the Environment

In Sewage Sludge

A study in Australia found several banned organochlorine pesticides (aldrin, chlordane, dieldrin, heptachlor, hexachlorbenzene, and DDT) in sewage sludge. Researchers found that in some cases, it takes as long as 15 years after the pesticides were banned for their levels in sewage sludge to drop below detectable levels.[1][2]

Articles and resources

Related SourceWatch articles

References

  1. Giffe Johnson, Organochlorine pesticides are called 'persistent' for a reason, Environmental Health News, April 22, 2010, Accessed September 28, 2010.
  2. Clarke, BO, NA Porter, PJ Marriott, and JR Blackbeard, "Investigating the levels and trends of organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyl in sewage sludge", Environment International, 2010.

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