PFOS

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PFOS, or perfluorooctane sulfonate, is a perfluorinated compound. PFOS is used for its properties that make materials stick and stain resistant. Until 2002, PFOS was a breakdown product of the chemicals used to make Scotchgard products.[1] Perfluorinated compounds like PFOS are highly persistent in the environment.

Human Exposure

Humans are exposed to PFOS and other perfluorinated compounds from food packaging, stain-resistant furniture, carpet, clothing, shoes, luggage, camping, and sporting equipment, and from non-stick cookware (particularly when the cookware is heated above 450F).[2] Humans are also exposed in dental floss and many cosmetics, including nail polish, facial moisturizers, and eye make-up.

Human Health Effects

According to Pollution in People, PFOS causes liver and thyroid cancer in rats.[3] Perfluorinated compounds are also linked to a number of other problems in laboratory animals, including liver and kidney damage and reproductive problems. The half-life for PFOS in a human body, or the time it would take to expel half of any amount consumed or absorbed by the body, is estimated at more than eight years.

Articles and resources

Related SourceWatch articles

References

  1. Perfluorinated Compounds (PFCs), Pollution in People], Accessed September 24, 2010.
  2. Perfluorinated Compounds (PFCs), Pollution in People], Accessed September 24, 2010.
  3. Perfluorinated Compounds (PFCs), Pollution in People], Accessed September 24, 2010.

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External articles