CMD superman logo.jpg SourceWatch, a project of the Center for Media and Democracy,

depends on donations from people like you!

Click here to make a tax-deductable contribution.

Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association

From SourceWatch
Revision as of 22:54, 24 May 2009 by Bob Burton (Talk | contribs)

(diff) ←Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision→ (diff)
Jump to: navigation, search

Learn more from the Center for Media and Democracy's research on climate change.

This article is part of the Coal Issues portal on SourceWatch, a project of CoalSwarm and the Center for Media and Democracy. See here for help on adding material to CoalSwarm.

Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association
Type Regional & Municipal Cooperative
Headquarters 1100 West 116th Ave.
Denver, CO 80234
Area served CO, NE, NM, WY
Key people Ken Anderson, CEO
Industry Electric Producer & Distributor
Products Electricity
Revenue $1.02 billion (2007)[1]
Net income $103.0 million (2007)[1]
Employees 996 (2003)
Website TriStateGT.org

Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association is a wholesale electric power supplier owned by the 44 electric cooperatives that it serves. Tri-State generates and transports electricity to its member systems throughout at 250,000 square mile service territory across Colorado, Nebraska, New Mexico, and Wyoming.[2]

Power portfolio

Out of its total 2,442 MW of electric generating capacity in 2005 (0.23% of the U.S. total), Tri-State produced 70.0% from coal, 24.7% from natural gas, and 5.3% from oil. Tri-State owns power plants in Colorado and New Mexico; 81.9% of Tri-State's generating capacity comes from power plants in Colorado.[3]

Proposed coal plants

On hold

Tri-State to reconsider future coal plant projects

Because of the current economic climate and ongoing uncertainty in federal and state regulations, Tri-State announced in April 2009 that it was revisiting its long-term resource plan, including options for new coal-fired power plants. Ken Anderson, the company's executive vice president and general manager, said in statement, "Significant changes in the regulatory climate and economy impact development projects and have disproportionately affected the near-term outlook for coal-based resources. Part of our reevaluation process will review how coal-based resources fit into our long-term resource plans." Tri-State will consider energy efficiency programs, renewable energy options, natural gas, and "clean coal" and nuclear technologies as part of its long-term planning process.[4]

Existing coal-fired power plants

Tri-State owned 8 coal-fired generating stations in 2005, with 1,710 MW of capacity. Here is a list of Tri-State's coal power plants:[3][5][6]

Plant Name State County Year(s) Built Capacity 2007 CO2 Emissions 2006 SO2 Emissions
Craig CO Moffat 1979, 1980, 1984 1339 MW 11,400,000 tons 3,586 tons
Escalante NM McKinley 1984 257 MW 1,924,000 tons 1,488 tons
Nucla CO Montrose 1959, 1991 114 MW 952,000 tons 1,399 tons

In 2006, Tri-State's 3 coal-fired power plants emitted 14.3 million tons of CO2 and 6,500 tons of SO2.

Articles and Resources

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 2007 Annual Report, Tri-State Generation & Transmission Assoc., p. 17.
  2. Tri-State website, accessed Aug. 2008.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Existing Electric Generating Units in the United States, 2005, Energy Information Administration, accessed April 2008.
  4. "Tri-State to review coal-fired power plant prospects," Power Engineering, April 13, 2009.
  5. Environmental Integrity Project, Dirty Kilowatts: America’s Most Polluting Power Plants, July 2007.
  6. Dig Deeper, Carbon Monitoring for Action database, accessed Aug. 2008.

Related SourceWatch Articles

External Articles