Angamos power station

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This article is part of the CoalSwarm coverage of Chile.
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Angamos is a 545-megawatt (MW) coal-fired power plant in Mejillones, II Region, Chile.

Location

The map below shows the plant, which is located in Mejillones' industrial zone.

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Background

Construction began in 2008 for this US$1.3 billion plant, which serves the world's largest copper mine (Escondida).[1] The plant, the first significant addition to northern Chile's SING (Sistema Interconectado del Norte Grande) power grid in the past decade, was completed ahead of schedule, with Unit 1 going online in April 2011 and Unit 2 following six months later.[2] It received widespread recognition within the industry for its modern design, including an advanced air quality control system and seawater cooling towers that were the first of their kind in South America. In 2012, the Angamos facility won Power Magazine's "Plant of the Year" award[3] and the international EEI Edison award.[4]

In mid-2016, the Chilean environmental agency SMA (Superintendencia del Medio Ambiente) charged the Angamos plant with several infractions of environmental regulations, including excessive emissions of pollutants in 2015.[5]


Project Details

  • Sponsor: AES Generation South America
  • Parent company: AES
  • Location: Mejillones, II Region, Chile
  • Coordinates: -23.0662683, -70.3701192 (exact)
  • Status:
    • Unit 1: Operating
    • Unit 2: Operating
  • Gross Capacity:
    • Unit 1: 272.5 MW
    • Unit 2: 272.5 MW
  • Type: Subcritical
  • Projected in service: 2011
  • Coal Type: Bituminous, Subbituminous
  • Coal Source:
  • Source of financing: Korea Trade Insurance Corporation (US$677 million)[6]

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References

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