Carbon Capture and Storage projects which have been abandoned

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Carbon Capture and Storage projects which have been abandoned include:

2008

  • May: In May 2007 Hydrogen Energy, a joint venture of Rio Tinto and BP, proposed to build a 500 megawatt Kwinana Power Station with Carbon Capture and Storage was launched in mid-may 2007. The joint venture partners announced that it was "beginning feasibility studies and work on plans for the potential development of a A$2 billion (US$1.5 billion) coal-fired power generation project at Kwinana in Western Australia that would be fully integrated with carbon capture and storage to reduce its emissions of greenhouse gases." [1] Less than a year after the company's upbeat launch, the Financial Times reported that the project had been quietly shelved as a result of the lack of suitable geological formations. "We wanted to be absolutely certain we had the right geology before we went ahead, because this would be the first project and would be a proof of concept," BP said.[2]

2011

  • October: the British government announced that the proposed 2,304 megawatt Longannet Power Station had been cancelled. The government stated that "a decision has been made not to proceed with Longannet but to pursue other projects with the £1bn funding made available by the government."[3] The month before the Guardian had reported that Scottish Power, and its partners Shell and the National Grid, said they had just completed a detailed study of the CCS scheme and have deep concerns about its commercial viability without heavier public backing beyond the £1bn of public money on offer.[4]

2012

  • June: Ayrshire Power, which is owned by Peel Energy, announced that it was withdrawing its application for its proposed Hunterston Power Station. The company stated that it had "taken this decision due to the level of uncertainty surrounding the ability to secure the necessary financial investment to build the power station in the foreseeable economic climate."[7] The company, which proposed to include a CCS plant for approximately 22% of its emissions, had encountered massive public opposition.[8]

Articles and resources

References

  1. "BP and Rio Tinto plan clean coal project for Western Australia", Media Release, May 21, 2007.
  2. Fiona Harvey, "BP axes plan for carbon capture plant", Financial Times, May 12, 2008.
  3. Hanna Gersmann and Fiona Harvey, "Longannet carbon capture project cancelled: Last remaining project in government competition for CCS funding scrapped as partners fall out over funding", The Guardian, October 19, 2011.
  4. Terry Macalister and Damian Carrington, "Flagship UK carbon capture project 'close to collapse'" The Guardian, Oct. 6, 2011.
  5. Project Pioneer, "About the plant", Project Pioneer website, accessed July 2010.
  6. "Project Pioneer partners conclude front-end study; will not proceed with CCS demonstration project", Media Release, April 26, 2012.
  7. Ayrshire Power, "Ayrshire Power puts power station with CCS on hold", Media Release, June 26, 2012.
  8. Severin Carrell, "Plans for carbon-capture power station abandoned: Environmentalists welcome Ayrshire Power's withdrawal of plans for coal-fired station at Hunterston due to financial concerns", Guardian, June 26, 2012.

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