Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum

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The Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF) describes itself as "an international climate change initiative that is focused on development of improved cost-effective technologies for the separation and capture of carbon dioxide for its transport and long-term safe storage. The purpose of the CSLF is to make these technologies broadly available internationally; and to identify and address wider issues relating to carbon capture and storage."[1]

Members

On its website the CSLF states that "membership is open to national governmental entities that are significant producers or users of fossil fuel and that have a commitment to invest resources in research, development and demonstration activities in carbon dioxide capture and storage technologies." Current members, as of February 2009, are[1]:

  • Australia
  • Brazil Flag
  • Canada
  • China
  • Colombia
  • Denmark
  • European Commission
  • France
  • Germany
  • Greece
  • India
  • Italy
  • Japan
  • Korea
  • Mexico
  • Netherlands
  • Norway
  • Russia
  • Saudi Arabia
  • South Africa
  • United Kingdom
  • United States

Contact Details

CSLF Secretariat
U.S. Department of Energy
FE-27
1000 Independence Ave., S.W.
Washington, DC 20585
U.S.A.
General E-mail: CSLFSecretariat@hq.doe.gov
Phone: 1-301-903-3820
Fax: 1-301-903-1591
Website: http://www.cslforum.org

Articles and Resources

Related SourceWatch Articles

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum, "About the CSLF", Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum website, accessed February 2009.

External Articles

CSLF Submissions

  • James Slutz, Chairman, CSLF Policy Group, Letter to Yvo de Boer", Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum, June 13, 2008.
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