Connecticut and fracking

From SourceWatch
Jump to navigation Jump to search

{{#badges: FrackSwarm|Navbar-fracking}}

Hartford Basin.

Introduction

In a portion of the state of Connecticut there is a geological formation known as the Hartford Basin, which the USGS believes may have gas, but of limited and questionable quality, suggesting it would not be economic to drill or frack anytime soon. Some in the state have called for a ban on fracking as a precaution.[1]

On March 27, 2013, the Connecticut legislature's Environment Committee voted to forward legislation banning the possession or storage of fracking waste in the state to the House of Representatives.[2]

History

Part of Connecticut is in a geological formation known as the Hartford Basin, stretching 34 miles long and varying in width from three to 15 miles. The entire basin lies under the Connecticut Valley from roughly the Vermont border to the Connecticut shoreline.

Geologists say the Hartford Basin is unlikely to be replete with gas: a good portion of the basin was overheated from volcanic activity, which likely vaporized any oil or gas, while other places were not heated enough to produce gas. Geologists therefore say it is unlikely the deposits will be extracted anytime soon, because they are probably too small, scattered, and of questionable quality.[3]

Texaco did exploratory geophysical work in the 1970s, and then paid for work in the 1980s to examine the hydrothermal history of the Connecticut Valley, but no further exploration took place.[3]

In June 2012, a US Geological Survey report assessed five East Coast basins, but only mentioned the Hartford Basin.

Waste Disposal

Washington, Coventry and Mansfield counties have imposed laws to keep fracking waste out.[4]

Citizen activism

Legislative issues and regulations

On March 27, 2013, the Connecticut legislature's Environment Committee voted to forward legislation banning the possession or storage of fracking waste in the state to the House of Representatives.[5]

Citizen groups

Industry groups

Resources

References

Related SourceWatch articles

Click on the map below for state-by-state information on fracking:

Alabama and frackingAlaska and frackingArizona and frackingArkansas and frackingCalifornia and frackingColorado and frackingConnecticut and frackingDelaware and frackingFlorida and frackingGeorgia and frackingHawaii and frackingIdaho and frackingIllinois and frackingIndiana and frackingIowa and frackingKansas and frackingKentucky and frackingLouisiana and frackingMaine and frackingMaryland and frackingMassachusetts and frackingMichigan and frackingMinnesota and frackingMississippi and frackingMissouri and frackingMontana and frackingNebraska and frackingNevada and frackingNew Hampshire and frackingNew Jersey and frackingNew Mexico and frackingNew York and frackingNorth Carolina and frackingNorth Dakota and frackingOhio and frackingOklahoma and frackingOregon and frackingPennsylvania and frackingRhode Island and frackingSouth Carolina and frackingSouth Dakota and frackingTennessee and frackingTexas and frackingUtah and frackingVermont and frackingVirginia and frackingWashington State and frackingWest Virginia and frackingWisconsin and frackingWyoming and frackingDelaware and frackingMaryland and frackingNew Hampshire and frackingNew Jersey and frackingMassachusetts and frackingConnecticut and frackingWest Virginia and frackingVermont and frackingRhode Island and frackingMap of USA with state names.png
About this image

External links

This article is a stub. You can help by expanding it.

Wikipedia also has an article on Connecticut and fracking. This article may use content from the Wikipedia article under the terms of the GFDL.