Covanta Energy Corporation

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Covanta Energy Corporation owns and operates over 30 waste-to-energy power generation plants worldwide. It is a subsidiary of Covanta Holding Corporation in Fairfield, New Jersey. The corporation is international, but exists predominantly in the United States. In the United States, Covanta processes over 5% of the nation's waste, and handles the waste disposal needs of 12 million people.[1]

Covanta operations

Covant's waste-burning power plants are located in Alabama, California, Connecticut, Florida, Indiana, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Virginia and in Trezzo, Italy.[2]

Covanta and coal

On its website, Covanta boasts that it "not only owns and operates coal facilities, but we led the development of the Quezon Power Project-- the largest private power project in the Philippines to date. This 440-megawatt facility provides a new source of energy for the people and businesses in the Mauban Province on the Island of Luzon. Covanta Energy's other coal projects, all located in China, rely on that country's domestic coal supply, which provides dependable fuel at prices that reflect energy costs in China."[3]

On its website it states that the Quezon Power Project is based on a "pulverized coal-fired electric generation facility and an approximately 30 kilometer, 230 kilovolt (kV) transmission line and high voltage substation. It has a single boiler and turbine generator and uses sub-bituminous coal for fuel. The facility is located on an approximately 100-hectare coastal site in the Mauban Province. The transmission line extends from the facility site to a substation in Tayabas. The project was designed to meet very high seismic resistance requirements and strict environmental standards equal to those of the World Bank and the United States ExIm Bank. Covanta Energy subsidiaries own 26 percent of this project and have a long-term contract to operate the facility."[3]

Covanta also states that it has a 96% stake in the Yanjian power station at Taixing in the Jiangsu Province in China. The 24 megawatt power station "uses pulverized coal and six boilers to generate electricity and steam. The plant commenced operation in 1995. As the facility is located in the Taixing Economic Development Zone, steam produced is supplied to customers within the region, mostly chemical plants. Covanta Energy has a 96 percent ownership in this project and assumed operations and maintenance in April 2001."[3]

Covanta Mid-Connecticut, Inc. (Covanta Mid-Conn) operates the Mid-Connecticut Resource Recovery Facility for the Connecticut Resource Recovery Authority (CRRA). Covanta Mid-Conn is owned by its parent company Covanta Energy Inc. The Mid-Conn. Resource Recovery Facility is located on the site of an old utility plant on the banks of the Connecticut River, and began commercial operation in October 1987. The facility processes approximately 2,000 tons of refuse derived fuel (RDF) per day or 624,000 tons per year while operating two 45-Megawatt (MW) electrical generators with an output of 68.5 MW. The facility is also designed to burn coal when solid waste is unavailable.[4]

Contact details

Covanta Holding Corporation
40 Lane Road
Fairfield, NJ 07004
Phone: 973-882-9000
Website: http://www.covantaholding.com/

Article and resources

Related SourceWatch articles

References

  1. Covanta Energy, "Covanta Energy", Covanta Energy website, accessed August 2009.
  2. Covanta Energy, "Covanta Facilities", Covanta Energy website, accessed August 2009.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 Covanta Energy, "International Energy", Covanta Energy website, accessed August 2009.
  4. "Covanta Mid-Conn" Covanta Holdings Website, September 2009.

External resources

External articles

Wikipedia also has an article on Covanta Energy Corporation. This article may use content from the Wikipedia article under the terms of the GFDL.