Dobrotvir power station

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Dobrotvir power station is a 510-megawatt (MW) coal-fired power station in Ukraine.

A 600 MW expansion has been proposed.

Location

The undated satellite photo below shows the power station in the western part of Ukraine, approximately 70 kilometers from Lviv.

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Background on existing plant

The Dobrotvirska power plant is owned by DTEK Zakhidenergo. It employs around 950 people.[1]

The power station consists of four operating units built from 1951–1964; four of the original units have been retired. According to the company's 2012 annual report, plans for the current units are as follows:[2]

  • Dobrotvir Unit 5 - 100 MW - commissioned 1960, retrofit 2010, planned: major overhaul in 2015 and 2020
  • Dobrotvir Unit 6 - 100 MW - commissioned 1961, retrofit 2009, planned: major overhaul in 2014 and 2019
  • Dobrotvir Unit 7 - 150 MW - commissioned 1963, retrofit 2011, planned: retrofit in 2013–2014 to increase the installed capacity by 10 MW
  • Dobrotvir Unit 8 - 150 MW - commissioned 1964, retrofit 2007, planned: retrofit in 2012–2013 to increase the installed capacity by 10 MW

In April 2014 DTEK said that the retrofitting of unit 8 was in progress.[3] Unit 8 was expanded to 160 MW in 2014.[4]

In 2007 plant efficiency was reported at 32.49 per cent; by 2014 DTEK reported it between 28 and 30 per cent. Coal is transported to Dobrotvirska from DTEK mines in both Donbass and Cervonograd, located 15 kilometers from the plant.[1]

According to DTEK's 2016 Annual report, unit 6 is planned to be mothballed in 2018.[5]

Proposed new units

Owner DTEK plans the construction of three new coal-fired units at Dobrotvir with capacity of 225MW each (675 MW total), replacing older units.[6]

DTEK Zakhidenergo will also construct a cross-border transmission line between Ukraine and Poland. According to the National Ecological Centre of Ukraine, the description of the transmission project states that all power from Dobrotvir would be exported.[6]

Construction of Units 9, 10 and 11 at 225 MW each initially began in 1988 but stopped due to the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. A Japanese delegation comprised of representatives from the ITOCHU Corporation and Tokyo Electric Power Services Co. visited the plant in 2010 and 2013, promoting a single ultra-supercritical 600 MW unit at a cost of US$870 million.[1]

In February 2014, ITOCHU Corporation together with Tokyo Electric Power Services released a feasibility study on a Dobrotvir extension, consisting of a 600 MW ultra-supercritical unit. The study estimates commercial operation at 2021.[7]

However, there has been no news on the project since the feasibility study, and plans appear to be deferred or abandoned.

Project Details of proposed new unit

  • Sponsor: DTEK Zakhidenergo
  • Parent company: SCM Holdings
  • Developer: ITOCHU Corporation, Tokyo Electric Power Services
  • Location: Kamianka-Buzka, Lviv Oblast, Ukraine
  • Coordinates: 50.21337, 24.375 (exact)
  • Status: Cancelled
  • Capacity: 600 MW
  • Type: Ultra-supercritical
  • Start date: 2021[6]
  • Coal Type: Hard coal (Bituminous)
  • Coal Source: Lviv Volyny coalfield
  • Source of financing:

Resources and articles

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 "Dusting off Ukraine's energy sector," Bankwatch, Sep 2014
  2. "Energy in Action," DETK Annual Report 2012, p. 75
  3. "DTEK Zakhidenergo to pay the state 43.3 million hryvnias in dividends," DTEK, Apr 25, 2014.
  4. "Integrated Report," DTEK Annual Report 2014, p. 92
  5. "Integrated Report," DTEK Annual Report 2016, p. 84
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 "Ukranian coal projects considered by energy community," National Ecological Centre of Ukraine, April 2013.
  7. Study on Dobrotvirska Coal-Fired Power Extension Project in Dobrotvirska, Ukraine," ITOCHU Corporation, Feb 2014.

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External resources

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