Emissions trading

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Learn more from the Center for Media and Democracy's research on climate change.

The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change describes emissions trading as "one of the three Kyoto mechanisms, by which an Annex I Party may transfer Kyoto Protocol units to or acquire units from another Annex I Party. An Annex I Party must meet specific eligibility requirements to participate in emissions trading."[1]

Emissions trading schemes

Greenhouse gas emissions trading schemes, including those that are proposed or currently under discussion, are[2]:

Airlines to be included in emissions trading

In May 2011, the EU announced that starting January 1, 2012, all airlines flying to Europe will be included in the Emissions Trading Scheme, forcing polluters to buy permits for each ton of carbon dioxide they emit above a certain cap. China's aviation authority opposes the measure, saying it will cost Chinese airlines 800 million yuan in the first year and more than triple that by 2020, and said Europe should adjust the ETS to reflect the differences between rich and poor countries. U.S. airlines also oppose inclusion in the ETS, but some of Europe's biggest airlines say the move is preferable to leaving airlines out, which would make them vulnerable to different environmental taxes from national governments. The U.S. industry group Air Transport Association of America is challenging the move in EU courts. EU officials argue that they took the step of including aviation in the ETS after years of fruitless debate within the United Nations about how to curb emissions from aviation.[3]

Resources

References

  1. United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, "Glossary of climate change acronyms", United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change website, accessed September 2008.
  2. Michael Szabo, "Factbox - Carbon Trading Schemes Around the World", Reuters September 11, 2008.
  3. Pete Harrison and Julien Toyer, "China threatens Airbus over EU carbon cap -sources" Reuters, May 20, 2011.

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