Puting Bato power station

From SourceWatch
Jump to: navigation, search

This article is part of the Coal Issues portal on SourceWatch, a project of CoalSwarm and the Center for Media and Democracy. See here for help on adding material to CoalSwarm.

This article is part of the CoalSwarm coverage of the The Philippines and coal
Sub-articles:
Related articles:

The Puting Bato power station (also known as Calaca SLTEC power plant) is a 270-megawatt (MW) coal-fired power station in Batangas Province, Philippines.

Location

The map below shows the location of the plant, in Puting Bato West Barangay, Calaca Municipality, Batangas Province.

Loading map...

Background on Plant

The Puting Bato power station is a 270-megawatt (MW) coal-fired power station in Calaca, Batangas, by South Luzon Thermal Energy Corp. (SLTEC). The estimated total cost of the project is P10 billion. SLTEC is a joint venture sponsored by Ayala Corporation's AC Energy Holdings and Phinma Corporation's Trans-Asia Oil and Energy Development.[1][2] In December 2016 Japanese business conglomerate Marubeni purchased a 20% stake in the project through its subsidiary Axia Power Holdings Philippines Corp., acquiring 15% from Ayala Corporation and 5% from Phinma Group.[3]

According to the Philippines Department of Energy (DOE), construction on Unit 1 (135 MW) began in December 2011 and construction of Unit 2 (135 MW) was targeted to begin in August 2013. As of August 2013, DOE described the status of the project as follows:[4]

50-50 joint venture project of TAOIL and AC Energy Holdings, Inc.; Purchase of land signed on January 2010; EPC contractor was awarded to DMCI on 31 March 2011; DENR-ECC issued to TAOil for project on 30 April 2010, SEC issued on 29 July 2011 latest amendment of the AOI was on 10 June 2013; DENR-ECC for the Ash Handling Facility issued to SLTEC on 24 January 2012; DENR-ECC for the switching Station issued on 21 January 2013; LGU Endorsement issued on 14 February 2012;GIS issued on 17 May 2013; BOI Approved Certificate for Unit I issued on 20 June 2012;PPA between SLTEC and TAOil was signed on 28 October 2011; BOC registration as importer issued on 2 December 2012; transfer of ECC to SLTEC on 14 Dec. 2011; GIS issued on 17 May 2012; financial close on 28 Oct. 2011; EPC Contract awarded to DMCI on 31 March 2011; Started Construction on December 2011;Construction Duration - 32 Months; Ground breaking - February 2012; Target Testing & Commissioning - May 2014; Done with the Feasibility Study & arrangement for securing the required land;Project cost is Php12.9B

According to the DOE, status of Unit 2 (135 MW) as of August 2013 was as follows:

Ongoing feasibility study; SEC Registration Certificate issued July 29, 2011 latest amendment of the AOI was on 10 June 2013;DENR-Amendment of ECC for the Ash Handling Facility issued to SLTEC on 24 January 2012;DENR-ECC for the Switching situation issued on 21 January 2013;LGU Endorsement issued on 14 February 2012;GIS issued 17 May 2013; LGU Endorsement issued Feb. 14, 2012; BOI approved certificate for Unit 2 issued on 24 September 2012; BOI registration as importer issued on 23 Dec 2011. Land already acquired, ongoing Titling and Conversion of Land to industrial; PPA between SLTEC and TAOil was signed on 17 April 2013;Done with the Feasibility Study and arrangement for securing the required land;Financial Close with tenders on 1 July 2013; EPC Contract awarded to DMCI on 3 May 2013; Start Construction (Target) - August 2013; Construction Duration will be 28 months; Groundbreaking Target Date - August 2013;Target Testing and Commissioning will be on June 2015; Target Commercial Operation - November 2015 Project cost is Php 9.6B

According to a press report, the estimated total cost of the project is P10 billion.[1] The construction contract was awarded to DM Consunji, a subsidiary of Consunji Group, which will also be providing coal for the plant.[5] Unit 1 was successfully tested in The October 2014.[6]

The project has been subject to repeated delays. Unit 1 was completed in April 2015[7] and inaugurated in June 2015.[8] In January 2015 the project's developers stated that Unit 2 would be brought online by the end of the year.[9]

Unit 2 completed its reliability test run in January 2016.[10]

Project Details

  • Sponsor: South Luzon Thermal Energy Corp.
  • Parent companies: Phinma Group 45%, Ayala Corporation 35%, Marubeni 20%
  • Location: Puting Bato West Barangay, Calaca Municipality, Batangas Province, Philippines
  • Coordinates: 13.91953, 120.82634 (exact)
  • Capacity: 135 MW (Units 1 & 2)
  • Status: Operating
  • Gross Capacity: 270 MW (2 x 135 MW units)
  • Type: Subcritical
  • In service: June 2015 (Unit 1); January 2016 (Unit 2)
  • Coal Type:
  • Source of Coal: Semi-Calaca Power Corp., a unit of Semirara Mining (owned by Consunji Group)[1]
  • Source of financing:

Articles and resources

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Iris C. Gonzales, "Ayala, Trans-Asia expanding thermal plant in Batangas," The Philippine Star, April 16, 2013.
  2. Miraflor, Madelaine. Calaca coal-fed power plant Unit 2 expected to come online in 3Q of 2015. Manila Bulletin, 11 Sept. 2014.
  3. Marubeni buys stake in Ayala-led power plant in Batangas, Steelguru, Dec. 21, 2016
  4. Energy Situationer 2013: Private Sector Initiated Projects, Philippines Department of Energy, 12 August 2013
  5. Trans-Asia, Ayala Power venture to start operations, Trans-Asia press release, Jan. 2014.
  6. South Luzon Thermal Energy’s Calaca Plant Successfully Synchs to the Grid, Fabian Philippines, 13 Oct. 2014.
  7. Alena Mae Flores, Batangas coal plant opens, Manila Standard, 5 Apr. 2015.
  8. Iris C. Gonzales, "SLTEC inaugurates P23-B power plant in Luzon," The Philippine Star, June 8, 2015
  9. Gonzales, Iris. Ayala unit targets 1,000-MW power capacity by 2016. Philippine Star, 9 Jan. 2015.
  10. "Overseas Attractions: Unit-2 of Philippines Puting Bato 1x135MW Coal-Fired Power Plant Project Has Completed the Reliability Test Run," China National Technical IMP & EXP Corp, January 26, 2016

Related SourceWatch articles

External resources

External articles