RightMarch.com

From SourceWatch
Jump to: navigation, search

RightMarch.com is listed as a member of Internet Freedom Coalition,[1] the Read The Bills Act Coalition,[2] the Audit the Fed Coalition,[3] and a member of the Patient OptOut Coalition.[4] RightMarch.org is listed as a Bronze Sponsor of The 912 Project March on Washington D.C.[5]

On its website RightMarch.com describes itself as "conservative organization" which states that it aims to counter "the well-financed antics of radical left-wing groups like MoveOn.org, by appealing to the grassroots 'silent majority' to take action -- contacting government and business leaders; placing newspaper, radio and television ads; and holding the Left accountable for their anti-American antics."[6]

On its website the group states that "we are the 'Rapid Response Force' against the ongoing liberal onslaught." It states that "RightMarch.com is a 501(c)(4) nonprofit political organization, the RightMarch.com PAC is a federal political action committee, and both are led by long-time conservative activist Dr. William Greene."[6]

According to the New York Times, William Greene's organization worked with Randall Terry in 2005 in support of the efforts of the family of the disabled Terri Schiavo to stop her estranged husband's efforts to have her feeding tube removed.[7]

According to a 2005 North Country Gazette article,[8] Greene's RightMarch PAC raised a total of $49,200 and donated $3,100 to candidates;[9] much of the rest of RightMarch's income was paid to an Internet consulting firm that Greene runs, the Georgia-based Strategic Internet Campaign Management. Of the total 2005 disbursements of $44,058, over $41,500 went to S.I.C.M. and other consulting firms to pay for RightMarch's list rentals, newspaper ads, radio ads, and hundreds of thousands of fax deliveries for RightMarch, according to the Federal Elections Commission.[10] Of the total 2006 disbursements of $50,032, over $33,282 went to S.I.C.M. and other consulting firms to pay for RightMarch's advertising costs and independent expenditures.[11] Of the total 2007 disbursements of $474,689, $432,397 went to Independent Expenditures (for or against candidates), $10,967 went to candidates, and $31,323 went to S.I.C.M. and other consulting firms to pay for list rentals, newspaper ads, radio ads, and fax deliveries.[12] Of the total 2008 disbursements of $188,793, $130,879 went to Independent Expenditures (for or against candidates), $3,750 went to candidates, and $51,393 went to S.I.C.M. and other consulting firms to pay for list rentals, newspaper ads, radio ads, and fax deliveries.[13]

In its 2006 Rightmarch.com Inc. IRS form 990 filing, Greene received $76,032 compensation, which was reported as charged to advertising.[14] In its 2008 Rightmarch.com Inc. IRS form 990 filing, the group only spent a total of $76,000, with none of it reported as compensation to Greene.[15]

Contact details

Website: http://www.rightmarch.com/

Articles and resources

Related SourceWatch articles

References

  1. "Internet Freedom Coalition", accessed September 2009.
  2. "Read the Bills Act Coalition", DownsizeDC.org blog 09/08/2009, accessed 30 November 2009.
  3. "Audit the Fed Coalition", accessed 30 November 2009.
  4. "Patient OptOut Coalition", accessed 30 November 2009.
  5. "09.12.09 March on Washington: National Sponsors", 09.12.09 March on Washington website, accessed September 2009.
  6. 6.0 6.1 "About RightMarch.com", RightMarch.com website, accessed September 2009.
  7. David D. Kirkpatrick, "The Schiavo case: The Money: Conservatives Invoke Case In Fund-Raising Campaigns", New York Times, March 25, 2005.
  8. Steven Ertelt, "Terri Schiavo's Family Blasts New PAC, Money Not Being Used Right", LifeNews.com, February 20, 2006.
  9. It should be noted, that the North Country Gazette is well-known for its biased inaccuracies, even within the pro-life community. See [1] and [2]
  10. [3]
  11. [4]
  12. [5]
  13. [6]
  14. 2006 IRS return, Rightmarch.com, December 2008, page 5.
  15. 2008 IRS return

External resources

External articles

This article is a stub. You can help by expanding it.