State Power Investment Corporation

From SourceWatch
Jump to: navigation, search

State Power Investment Corporation (国家电力投资集团) is one of the five largest state-owned electricity producers in the People's Republic of China. It is engaged in development, investment, construction, operation, and management of power plants and power generation in twenty-seven Chinese provinces, supplying approximately ten percent of the country's electricity.

History

The company was formed in July 2015 by the merger of the China Power Investment Corporation (CPI) and State Nuclear Power Technology Corporation (SNPTC).[1]

Subsidiaries

As a holding company, SPIC wholly owns or controls a vast structure of subsidiaries, including 48 companies at the second tier level, among which are 4 publicly listed companies. SPIC is central state owned enterprise administrated by the SASAC for the People's Republic of China.

Listed subsidiaries

  • China Power International Development Limited (SEHK 2380), listed in Hong Kong is the largest listed subsidiary with many power stations in China. The company had total assets of 284.2 billion yuan ($41.55 billion) at the end of 2008 and is consolidating its regional assets.[2][3]
  • Shanghai Electric, listed in both Shenzhen and Hong Kong, is a power equipment manufacturer and the world's largest manufacturer of steam turbines.[4]
  • SPIC Yuanda Environmental-Protection (SSE 600292), listed in Shanghai, is an environmental protection company that manages waste water and gas and solid waste.
  • Jilin Electric Power, listed in Shenzhen, is a power company that generates electricity including operating wind power projects in Jilin.

Other subsidiaries

Articles and resources

References

  1. "Chinese nuclear giant officially launched", World Nuclear Association (16 July 2015). Retrieved on 4 May 2015. 
  2. Li Weitao (2009-03-07). "China Power Investment Corp plans to list all its assets", chinadaily.com.cn. Retrieved on 15 February 2010. 
  3. CPI Overview
  4. Glasson, Paul (5 July 2011). "Looking beyond the resources boom", The Australian. Retrieved on 14 June 2011. 

Related SourceWatch articles

External resources

This article is a stub. You can help by expanding it.

External articles