Qiang Xiao

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Xiao Qiang is Chief Editor of the China Digital Times and sits on the board of advisors for the International Campaign for Tibet.

"Xiao Qiang is the Director of The China Internet Project at the Graduate School of Journalism, University of California at Berkeley. A theoretical physicist by training, Xiao Qiang studied at the University of Science and Technology of China and entered the PhD program (1986-1989) in Astrophysics at the University of Notre Dame. He became a full time human rights activist after the Tiananmen Massacre in 1989. Xiao was former Executive Director of New York based NGO Human Rights in China (1991 - 2002). He has spoken at each meeting of the United Nations Commission on Human Rights in Geneva from 1993 to 2001, and has testified before the American Congress. He has lectured on the promotion of human rights and democracy in China in over 40 countries in Asia, Europe, North America, Latin America and Africa. Xiao is also a weekly commentator for Radio Free Asia.

"Xiao is a recipient of the MacArthur Fellowship in 2001, and is profiled in the book Soul Purpose: 40 People Who Are Changing the World for the Better, (Melcher Media, 2003). He was also a visiting fellow of the Santa Fe Institute in Spring, 2002. Xiao is currently teaching classes on Participatory Media, China and Human Rights; researching the confluence of information and communication technologies and China's social and political transition; and running the China Digital Times news portal to explore how emerging participatory media technologies and practices can advance the world's understanding of China. He is also the author of a personal bilingual blog: Rock-n-Go, and a public speaker on China's information revolution, human rights and its democratic future." [1]also

He is "currently vice-chair of the steering committee of the World Movement for Democracy." [2]

Resources and articles

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References

  1. Advisory Board, WikiLeaks, accessed October 17, 2007.

External links