Centrisys

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{{#badges:ToxicSludge}} Centrisys Corporation manufacturers "centrifuge dewatering systems. . . for most industries including: municipal and industrial wastewater, sludge dewatering, beverage, dairy, food, fish, starch technology, chemical and pharmaceutical, oilfield, drilling mud, tank bottoms, slop oils, remediation, rendering, cow, chicken and pig manure, [and] oily wastes."[1]

Involvement in the Toxic Sludge Industry

Centrisys' business is the "dewatering" of toxic sludge in order to enable its "disposal," i.e. dumping in landfills or spreading on agricultural land, in most cases. "Biosolids"-- the sewage industry's euphemistic term for toxic sludge-- may be applied to cropland with no restrictions and sold or given away to gardeners as "organic fertilizers," and hundreds of municipalities and companies do so.

A list of just some of the hazardous chemicals and pathogens found in sludge can be found in the article Sludge contaminants. Sludge contaminants include Dioxins and Furans, Flame Retardants, Metals, Organochlorine Pesticides, 1,2-Dibromo-3-Chloropropane (DBCP), Naphthalene, Triclosan, Nonylphenols, Phthalates, Nanosilver, and thousands more substances. "Sewage is the mix of water and whatever wastes from domestic and industrial life are flushed into the sewer. ... We must note that, though the aim of sewage treatment is to produce clean water, it is never to produce 'clean' sludge. Indeed, the 'dirtier' the sludge - the more complete its concentration of the noxious wastes - the more the treatment has done its job. ... very waste produced in our society that can be got rid of down toilets and drains and that can also be got out of the sewage by a given treatment process will be in the sludge. Sludge is thus inevitably a noxious brew of vastly various and incompatible materials unpredictable in themselves and in the toxicity of their amalgamation, incalculably but certainly wildly dangerous to life." [2]

According to Sludge News, "[t]he policy of disposing of sludge by spreading it on agricultural land - a policy given the benign term 'land application' - has its inception in the Ocean Dumping ban of 1987. Before 1992, when the law went into effect, the practice had been, after extracting the sludge from the wastewater, to load it on barges and dump it 12, and later 106 miles off shore into the ocean. But many people who cared about life in the ocean knew that, wherever it was dumped, the sludge was causing vast dead moon-scapes on the ocean floor. New EPA regulations for 'land application' were promulgated in 1993. With the aid of heating and pelletizing and some slippery name morphs along the way, EPA claimed sludge could be transmogrified into 'compost' ... . But the land “application” of sewage sludge ... will pollute the whole chain of life for which soil is the base." [3]

Participant in the 2011 BioCycle 11th Annual Conference on "Renewable Energy from Organics Recycling"

Centrisys was a participant in the 2011 BioCycle 11th Annual Conference on "Renewable Energy from Organics Recycling." BioCycle Magazine is a publication serving the interests of the sewage sludge industry.[4]

Resources

Other SourceWatch Resources

References

  1. Centrisys Corporation, Centrisys, corporate website, accessed November 3, 2011
  2. About Sewage Sludge, SludgeNews.com, Accessed June 18, 2010.
  3. About Sewage Sludge, SludgeNews.com, accessed June 18, 2010
  4. BioCycle, Exhibitor Directory, publisher's website, accessed November 3, 2011
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