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Clinton administration anti-terrorism law

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The Clinton administration's anti-terrorism law efforts evoked the following December 1996 comment by conservative James Bovard, policy advisor for the Future of Freedom Foundation.

The President is "continuing to agitate for new powers to suppress terrorists" and "demanding more powers for wiretaps, more powers to prevent people from using encryption for their e-mail, more powers to classify normal crimes as terrorist offenses, and so forth."
"As usual," the President's "solution to every problem is more power for himself and his cronies" and he has "scorned opponents of his terrorist proposals, claiming that they want to 'turn America into a safe house for terrorists.'"

Clinton administration counterterrorism efforts have been subjected to significant scrutiny at least since the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States hearings and testimony.

Also see Clinton administration: Homeland Defense Before 2001 for extensive citations on the Clinton administration's activities related to homeland defense, as well as background on anti-terrorism activities during the Ronald Reagan administration.

Key Personnel

Legislation, Documents, Hearings, Testimony & Reports

Overviews

1995

1996

  • Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) Draft Amendment "intended to stop people from teaching how to create explosives with intent of criminal acts. Gutted before passage. A version has been reintroduced, July 96, as an amendment to S.1762." (EFF).

1997

1998

1999

2000

Other Sources

  • Numerous links to articles and commentary on proposed legislation in the "Terrorism Archive" of the Electronic Frontier Foundation.
  • Numerous links to other "1996 Counterrorism Proposals" and "1995-1996 Counterterrorism Bill Files" posted by EPIC.
  • Numerous links on Counterterrorism posted by Center for Nonproliferation Studies.

Articles & Commentary

Profiles

1995

1996

1997

1998

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

  • "Bush Administration's First Memo on al-Qaeda Declassified. January 25, 2001, Richard Clarke Memo: 'We urgently need ... a Principals level review on the al Qida network.' Document Central to Clarke-Rice Dispute on Bush Terrorism Policy Pre-9/11," National Security Archive Electronic Briefing Book No. 147, Edited by Barbara Elias, February 10, 2005.

2006

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