Vermont voting issues

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Election and registration information

Voter bill of rights

VERMONT VOTER BILL OF RIGHTS

  • You have the right to vote if you are a U.S. citizen, live in Vermont, are 18 years old and have registered.
  • You have the right to vote if you are homeless.
  • You have the right to vote if you have been convicted of a felony, even while you are incarcerated.
  • You have the right to vote even if you have a guardian and even if you need help reading or filling out your ballot.
  • You have the right to vote or cast your ballot if you are in line by 7:00 p.m. on Election Day.
  • You have the right to know if you are registered to vote.
  • You have the right to ask for help from elections officials or from a friend or family member. There are some people who cannot help you vote, for example, your boss or a union officer from your job.
  • You have the right to a secret vote. You do not have to tell anyone how you voted.
  • You have the right to get a new ballot if you make a mistake.
  • You have the right to vote for the person you want. You can write-in someone else's name if you don't like the choices on your ballot.
  • You have the right to leave some choices blank on your ballot. The choices you do mark will still count.
  • You have the right to use a voting system for all federal elections that makes it possible for people with disabilities to vote privately and independently.
  • You have the right to get a "provisional ballot" if you are told you are not registered to vote and you cannot swear or affirm that you submitted an application to register to vote in Vermont before the deadline.
  • You have the right to know if your ballot, including a "provisional ballot," was accepted for counting.
  • You have the right to file a complaint if you think your voting rights have been denied.

Call toll-free within Vermont at 1-800-439-8683 to get more information about these and other voting rights.

Voting Machines used November, 2008 in Vermont

VERMONT uses the following voting machines in addition to hand-counted paper ballots in some counties. For a county-by-county list of the specific machines (and the source for this section) see Verified Voting's Verifier tool.

Optical scan machines:

Vote by Phone with verifiable paper trail:

Main article: Voting machines

Governmental election authorities

Secretary of State Deborah L. Markowitz

Elections website: http://vermont-elections.org/

Contact information:

  • Elections Division
  • Vermont Secretary of State
  • 26 Terrace Street
  • Montpelier, VT 05609-1101
  • In-State: (800) 439-8683
  • Outside VT: (802) 828-2464
  • FAX: 802-828-5171
  • Email: mhodge@sec.state.vt.us


Election threats

  • For an extensive log of voting machine problems, see the VotersUnite! report on election incidents.[1]

State and local non-governmental election organizations

League of Women Voters

LWV of Vermont, Ms. Catherine Rader, President

  • 1186 Town Hill Road
  • E. Montpelier, VT 05651-4263
  • Phone: 802-657-0242
  • Fax: 802-658-7616
  • E-mail: info@lwvofvt.org
  • http://www.lwvofvt.org

Local Leagues:


Vermonters for Voting Integrity

Website: http://vtvoters.org/

Description[2]: Vermonters for Voting Integrity is a group of concerned citizens working to improve the transparency and accuracy of our election system.

Articles and resources

See also


References

  1. See the VotersUnite! Election Problem Log.
  2. From home page. Retrieved November 21, 2008.

External resources

Poll location

Election Protection hotlines

Voting information

Voting rights

Voting requirements

Election officials, election reform groups, and elected officials

Absentee voting

Disabled voters

Student voting rights

State ballot

  • See how organizations you trust recommend you vote on ballot measures and other statewide contests at TransparentDemocracy.

Languages

  • Help in other languages from the U.S. Election Assistance Commission. 中文, 日本語, 한국어, Tagalog, Tiếng Việt, Español

Voting machines

Election law


External articles