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Family Security Matters

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This article is part of the Center for Media & Democracy's spotlight on front groups and corporate spin.

Family Security Matters (FSM) originated in 2003 as a project of the Center for Security Policy, a hawkish security policy think tank and advocacy group. Soon after its formation FSM claimed to represent "security moms". While generally supportive of President George W. Bush's domestic and international security policies, FSM have had their differences with the Republican administration over issues such as immigration policy[1], U.S. policy towards Russian Presdient Vladimir Putin[2]. Since the Democratic ascendancy in the 2006 mid-term elections, FSM have also published criticisms of the Bush administration -- such as those by Newt Gingrich -- for being too cautious in their strategy in the Middle East.[3]

FSM states on its website that its mission is to "inform all Americans, men and women, about the issues surrounding national security; to address their fears about safety and security on a personal, family, community, national and international level; to highlight the connection between individual safety and a strong national defense; to increase civic participation and political responsibility; and to empower all Americans to become proactive defenders of our national security and community safety." [4]

Origins

According to whois.com, the domain name for FSM's website was registered by Carol Taber of CAT & Associates on July 6, 2003. On its website the following year, Gay Bryant, the Editorial Director of The Family Security Group, described FSM as a "non-profit, nonpartisan communications initiative formed by a group of passionate women." [5]

Bryant also explained that "a year ago we formed an alliance with the Center for Security Policy, www.centerforsecuritypolicy.org, a prestigious nonpartisan Washington think tank whose aim is to promote world peace through American strength. This association gives us access to vital security information from inside the heart of Washington, D.C." It role, it stated, was to "build grassroots efforts and resources for making the Security Mom's voice heard in the White House and on Capitol Hill." [5]

At that time Tabor wrote that "last year, I heard its president, Frank J. Gaffney, Jr. (a former Assistant Secretary of Defense) give a speech that deeply inspired me to serve my country by using my experience as a publisher of women's magazines to communicate to American women what we need to know. The truth is that America does need to ensure our national security by hunting down these truly evil extremists and destroying them. Defensive action alone simply cannot protect our children and the free society we want them to inherit."

In August 2004 FSM listed its address as "1920 L Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20036"[5], the same address at the time as that of the Center for Security Policy.[6]

In its 2003 annual report, the Center for Security Policy devoted a section to explaining its role with FSM.

The Center for Security Policy has established a partnership with the Family Security Group (FSG) led by CarolTaber, one of the Nation’s premier publishing professionals, to address what is, arguably, one of the most serious security challenges of our time: The fact that too many Americans are unaware of and disengaged from the policies and practices that may determine their own safety -- and that of their families and the Nation -- in the years ahead. This partnership will strive to keep our countrymen and women -- and most especially the latter -- well informed about such issues. The goal is to empower the public to play the role it must if the United States is to be made as secure as possible in an increasingly dangerous world. It will do so via: an interactive website, a newsletter entitled Family Security Matters, aggressive research, polling and public relations and community-oriented outreach programs. Through the effective use of such tools, the CSP-FSG team has the potential to add enormously to the policy impact of the Center’s educational mission. [7]

In an August 2004 media release, the Center for Security Policy announced the partnership between FSM and has the Center's DivestTerror.org campaign, aimed at pressuring 400 public companies which it claimed "are providing revenues, technology and moral cover to governments that sponsor terrorism." [8]

However, in its next annual report, CSP did not mention FSM.

Following an appearance on Fox News in September 2004, Media Matters for America (MMA) described Family Security Matters as a "front group for the Center for Security Policy (CSP), a conservative Washington think tank". In support of it claim, MMA pointed out that the phone number listed on the FSM website at the time was answered by the CSP.) [9]

In 2005 the parent organization of FSM, the Family Security Foundation, was registered as a 501(c)(3) non-profit group with the U.S. Internal Revenue Service. RightWeb notes that in its IRS return, the foundation describes its mission as "to fill the education gap" and that "FSM publishes Middle Eastern, terrorism, and defense experts on the subject of national security threats to America." The stated objective for 2006 was "to complete college study."[10][11]

Funding

The Center for Security Policy's annual return for 2004 listed "Family Security Group, LLC" on its "other investments" schedule with the company being valued at $75,999. On a subsequent schedule listing "taxable subsidiaries: the Center listed the "Family Security Group, LLC" which it listed it as having a 51% interest in with its activities described as "national security awareness". The company was listed as having made a loss of $34,001.<refname="IRS 2004">Center for Security Policy, Form 990 2004, Statement 8, August 2006, page 20.</ref>The following year the Center listed the value of the Family Security Group LLC as being $115,764.[12] Later in its return the center indicated that the company had made a loss of $58,835 for the year.[13]

FSM's IRS return for the period of October 18,2005 to the end of December that year provided no financial details as the group income for the period was under $25,000 threshold for disclosure of financial details. The IRS return lists Carol Tabor as the President. The organization's address and phone number is not disclosed. However, Guidestar lists the foundation's address as 2020 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Suite 298 Washington, DC 2006.[11]

Personnel

Staff

Board of Directors

As of June 2006, the website listed the board of directors as:

Board of Advisors

Contributing Editors

Former staff

Contact details

Family Security Matters
P. O. Box 70
Ridgewood, New Jersey 07450
Web: http://www.familysecuritymatters.com/

Resources

Related SourceWatch articles

References

  1. Michael Cutler, "US Attorney Sutton Misrepresents Circumstances of Ramos/Compean Case", Family Security Matters, November 20, 2007.
  2. Alex Alexiev, In Russia, a landslide to tyranny", Family Security Matters, December 5, 2007.
  3. Newt Gingrich, "Sleepwalking Into a Nightmare", November 29, 2007.
  4. Family Security Matters, "About FSM: Mission", accessed December 2007.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 Gay Bryant, "About Us", Family Security Matters.com, August 12, 2004.
  6. Center for Security Policy, "About Us", archived page from August 21, 2004.
  7. Center for Security Policy, Promoting Peace Through Strength: Activities Report for 2003 and 2004", accessed December 2006, page 10.
  8. "Family Security Matters launches Women Against Terror", Media Release, August 24, 2004.
  9. G.W., "FOX's 'security mom' expert spouted Bush-Cheney talking points," Media Matters for America, September 29, 2004.
  10. [http://rightweb.irc-online.org/profile/3368 "Family Security Matters", Right Web, October 11, 2007.
  11. 11.0 11.1 Family Security Foundation, Form 990 2005, August 1, 2006.
  12. Center for Security Policy, Form 990 2005, Statement 6, August 2006, page 20.
  13. Center for Security Policy, Form 990 2005, Statement 8, August 2006, page 22.

External articles

External resources