Tim Bell

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Tim Bell (full name Timothy John Leigh Bell) is founder of the British PR firm Bell Pottinger Public Affairs and a member of the British Parliament's upper chamber.

In 1970, Bell was one of the founders of the advertising company Saatchi & Saatchi. He played a critical role in the career of conservative British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher. Bell directed the advertising campaigns for the Conservative Party in the 1979, 1983 and 1987 elections. In 1990, Margaret Thatacher awarded Bell a knighthood.

Bell has also consulted for media mogul Rupert Murdoch, Russian billionaire Boris Berezovsky, Ukrainian president Viktor Yushchenko, Russian president Boris Yeltsin, the Sultan of Brunei, British media mogul Conrad Black and Margaret's son Mark Thatcher. [3]

Bell assisted Mark Thatcher when he stood accused of assisting a coup plot in Equatorial Guinea, facing a possible 15 year jail sentence in South Africa. Explaining that he helped "because he's Margaret's son and I can't think of anything I wouldn't do for Mrs T.," Bell fielded media calls on the case and gave Mark Thatcher media and PR advice. "My advice was very simple: it isn't the media that's deciding your fate; it's the judicial process in South Africa. So, ignore the media and pay attention to your lawyers," said Bell. [4]

Bell's also been referred to as "the propagandist who helped to crush the resistance of the striking coal miners." [5]

In 2004, Bell Pottinger Public Affairs was awarded a contract by the Coalition Provisional Authority to promote democracy in Iraq. Bell described his role as "masterminding the campaign in London." [6].

In an interview published days before the British General Election 2005, Bell called the TV coverage of the campaign "trivial rubbish," adding, "Is it any wonder that nobody is very interested, if that's what they're fed? It's very sad that the whole political process has been dumbed down." Bell went on to express frustration with how the candidates were being marketed, saying, "There's no great ad - there's no great slogan." Bell also dismissed get-out-the-youth-vote efforts: "I think they need to leave young people alone. There's only ever been a low turnout among young people. Why should they be interested in politics? There are so many more exciting things for them to do." [7]


Tim Bell has a conviction for ‘wilfuly, openly and obscenely’ exposing himself ‘with intent to insult a female’ under Section 4 of the 1824 Vagrancy Act. [1]

He is a former director of the Centre for Policy Studies (1989-92)[2]

Books

  • Mark Hollingsworth, The Ultimate spin doctor: the life and fast times of Tim Bell, Coronet Books: Hodder and Stoughton, London, 1997.

External links

Resources and articles

Related Sourcewatch

References

  1. "[1]"
  2. @[2]@
  3. Inner Circle, ICE Circle, accessed January 16, 2011.
  4. Board, Fortune Forum, accessed January 16, 2011.
  5. Chime plc Board, organizational web page, accessed April 4, 2013.