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Atlas Network

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The Atlas Network (formerly known as the Atlas Economic Research Foundation) was founded in 1981 by Antony Fisher. A "Johnny Appleseed" of antiregulation groups, it is closely affiliated with the U.K.-based Institute of Economic Affairs, the University of Buckingham (which has ties to the Global Warming Policy Foundation) and an international analogue, the International Policy Network (formerly known as Atlas Economic Research Foundation (UK)). Atlas Network is an "associate" member of the State Policy Network, a web of right-wing “think tanks” in every state across the country. [1]

News and Controversies

On August 11, 2017, Lee Fang discussed his recent article about the Atlas Network in an interview with Amy Goodwin on Democracy Now. In the interview, "Lee Fang on How a Little-Known U.S. Libertarian Think Tank Is Remaking Latin American Politics," Fang discusses how the Atlas Network is currently changing the landscape of Latin American politics. [2]

On August 9, 2017, Lee Fang's work on the Atlas Network was published in The Intercept. In his article, "Sphere of Influence: How American Libertarians are Remaking Latin American Politics," [3] Fang provides an overview of the Atlas Network’s historical rise to power, its methods for promoting its libertarian ideology, and its funding stream.

The foundation for the Atlas Network originated in the 1940s with Antony Fisher’s views of libertarian economics, and grew into a global conglomerate of actors that seek to defeat socialism at every level. With the aid of “business filings and records from three continents” and “interviews with libertarian leaders across the hemisphere” Fang unravels the paradigm shift from leftists governments towards rightwards thinkers currently underway in Latin America. This shift in power is most evident, according to Fang, in Brazil, Argentina, Honduras, Chile, and Venezuela where regime changes and ideological revolutions have been the most pronounced.

Fang points out that Atlas’ methods include using conservative and free market think tanks to defeat socialism. According to Fang, “[Atlas] gives grants for new think tanks, provides courses on political management and public relations, sponsors networking events around the world, and, in recent years, has devoted special resources to prodding libertarians to influence public opinion through social media and online videos.” Such think tanks, Fang argues, use the credibility of academic institutions to influence political discourses and transform methods for political engagement.

The Atlas Network’s success has also hinged on its funding streams. According to Fang, major Atlas donors have included the Koch Foundation, ExxonMobil, MasterCard, John Templeton, Donors Trust, and the American government. The Atlas Network began with the Institute of Economic Affairs, which was established by Antony Fisher in 1955, and has grown into a consortium of “450 think tanks around the world.” Through these think tanks, the Atlas Network distributed over $5 million in 2016, and nearly $30 million since 2009 (see below).

Mission - "Johnny Appleseed" of antiregulation groups

For over two decades, a Virginia-based organization has been quietly working as the Johnny Appleseed of antiregulation groups. With a modest $4 million dollar budget in 2003 and a staff of eight, Atlas Economic Research Foundation is on a mission to populate the world with new "free market" voices. In its 2003 review of activities, quaintly titled its "Investor Report," Atlas announced it worked with "70 new think-tank entrepreneurs from 37 foreign countries and several states of the U.S.," including Lithuania, Greece, Mongolia, Ghana, the Philippines, Brazil and Argentina.

The mission of Atlas, according to John Blundell (president from 1987 to 1990), "is to litter the world with free-market think-tanks."

Named after the Greek god condemned to bear the heavens on his shoulders, Atlas identifies, screens and offers initial support to individuals and groups who want to create local think tanks. "Our ideal 'intellectual entrepreneur,'" says Atlas, is "someone who communicates effectively with businessmen, academicians and the general public." By facilitating the establishment of local think tanks, Atlas increases both the reach and local credibility of their "free market" message, thereby having "the most cost-effective impact."

Since its formation in 1981, Atlas has funneled over $20 million in grants to think tanks that have passed its screening process. Atlas aims, it says, to "increase that amount tenfold in the next decade." In 2003, a little over $2 million of Atlas's 2003 budget was passed on to other think tanks. While the large conservative foundations take the approach of making large sustained and often untied grants, Atlas believes less is more, providing new think tanks with only small grants of $5,000 or less. Atlas weans their fledgling projects off this modest annual funding within five years, making exception only for specific innovative projects.

Atlas' think tanks, Chaufen continued, have "remarkable successes" even though they were often faced with "unsympathetic local traditions and ideas. Still, these think tanks have become one of the first places opinion leaders and policy makers go when they are looking for market-based solutions to difficult social, economic or environmental problems".

Ties to the State Policy Network

Atlas Network is an "associate" member of the State Policy Network, a web of right-wing “think tanks” in every state across the country. [4] SPN is a web of right-wing “think tanks” and tax-exempt organizations in 49 states, Puerto Rico, Washington, D.C., Canada, and the United Kingdom. As of July 2017, SPN's membership totals 153. It is an $83 million right-wing empire as of the 2011 funding documents from SPN itself and each of its state "think tank" members. Although SPN's member organizations claim to be nonpartisan and independent, the Center for Media and Democracy's in-depth investigation, "EXPOSED: The State Policy Network -- The Powerful Right-Wing Network Helping to Hijack State Politics and Government," reveals that SPN and its member think tanks are major drivers of the right-wing, American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC)-backed corporate agenda in state houses nationwide, with deep ties to the Koch brothers and the national right-wing network of funders.[5]

In response to CMD's report, SPN Executive Director Tracie Sharp told national and statehouse reporters that SPN affiliates are "fiercely independent." Later the same week, however, The New Yorker's Jane Mayer caught Sharp in a contradiction. In her article, "Is IKEA the New Model for the Conservative Movement?," the Pulitzer-nominated reporter revealed that, in a recent meeting behind closed doors with the heads of SPN affiliates around the country, Sharp "compared the organization’s model to that of the giant global chain IKEA." She reportedly said that SPN "would provide 'the raw materials,' along with the 'services' needed to assemble the products. Rather than acting like passive customers who buy finished products, she wanted each state group to show the enterprise and creativity needed to assemble the parts in their home states. 'Pick what you need,' she said, 'and customize it for what works best for you.'" Not only that, but Sharp "also acknowledged privately to the members that the organization's often anonymous donors frequently shape the agenda. 'The grants are driven by donor intent,' she told the gathered think-tank heads. She added that, often, 'the donors have a very specific idea of what they want to happen.'"[6]

A set of coordinated fundraising proposals obtained and released by The Guardian in early December 2013 confirm many of these SPN members' intent to change state laws and policies, referring to "advancing model legislation" and "candidate briefings." These activities "arguably cross the line into lobbying," The Guardian notes.[7]

Ties to the Kochs

Atlas has received funding from Koch Family Foundations.

Koch Wiki

The Koch brothers -- David and Charles -- are the right-wing billionaire co-owners of Koch Industries. As two of the richest people in the world, they are key funders of the right-wing infrastructure, including the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) and the State Policy Network (SPN). In SourceWatch, key articles on the Kochs include: Koch Brothers, Koch Industries, Americans for Prosperity, American Encore, and Freedom Partners.

Ties to the Bradley Foundation

Atlas has received funding from the Bradley Foundation.

Bradley Files

In 2017, the Center for Media and Democracy (CMD), publishers of SourceWatch, launched a series of articles on the Milwaukee-based Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation, exposing the inner-workings of one of America's largest right-wing foundations. 56,000 previously undisclosed documents laid bare the Bradley Foundation's highly politicized agenda. CMD detailed Bradley's efforts to map and measure right wing infrastructure nationwide, including by dismantling and defunding unions to impact state elections; bankrolling discredited spin doctor Richard Berman and his many front groups; and more.

Find the series here at ExposedbyCMD.org.

Climate Change Denial

Atlas has cosponsored Heartland Institute events dedicated to the proposition that climate change is not a crisis and has supported organizations such as the John Locke Foundation which has attacked efforts by state elected officials working on climate solutions with the Center for Climate Strategies. [8]

Affiliations

Some of the other organisations that Atlas has supported include:

Closely affiliated organisations include:

They have a database called the Global Partner Directory with basic information about 481 partners in 92 countries around the world.

Atlas Funds Think Tanks

Many of the think tanks Atlas funds are outside of the US so the recipients are unknown. This is due to the the IRS tax code which does not require the disclosure of international grantees.

2016

Total Grants and Awards distributed to Atlas partners in 2016 [9]

  • Canada: Total Grants and Awards for the Region = $204,671
  • United States, Total Grants and Awards for the Region = $531,387
  • Latin America & Caribbean, Total Grants and Awards for the Region = $1,689,010
  • Europe & Central Asia: Total Grants and Awards for the Region = $1,768,710
  • Middle East & North Africa: Total Grants and Awards for the Region = $278,927
  • Africa: Total Grants and Awards for the Region = $264,418
  • South Asia: Total Grants and Awards for the Region = $276,591
  • East Asia & Pacific: Total Grants and Awards for the Region = $238,806
  • Australia & New Zealand: Total Grants and Awards for the Region = $700

2015

Total Grants and Awards distributed to Atlas partners in 2015 = $4,230,719 [10] [11]

Below is a breakdown of the regions that received grants for "economic education": [11]

  • $275,092 to Sub-Saharan Africa
  • $363,840 to East Asia and the Pacific
  • $149,571 to North America
  • $1,512,487 to Europe
  • $697,172 to South America
  • $215,703 to the Middle East
  • $237,476 to Central America
  • $237,682 to South Asia

The following domestic organizations received grants from the Atlas Network in 2015: [11]

2014

According to its 2014 990 form, the Atlas Network distributed $4,354,783 in grants [12]

Below is a breakdown of the regions that received grants for "economic education": [11]

  • $297,769 to Sub-Saharan Africa
  • $240,963 to East Asia and the Pacific
  • $81,647 to North America
  • $1,491,967 to Europe
  • $984,001 to South America
  • $130,677 to the Middle East
  • $42,958 to Central America
  • $616,736 to South Asia

The following domestic organizations received grants from the Atlas Network in 2014: [11]

  • $20,000 to The Foundation for Government Accountability
  • $5,800 to American Principles in Action
  • $10,000 to State Policy Network
  • $146,054 to Students for Liberty
  • $40,700 to Taliesin Nexus
  • $25,000 to American Slovenian Education Foundation
  • $50,000 to Foundation for Democracy in Russia
  • $11,000 to Illinois Policy Institute
  • $8,000 to Interamerican Institute for Democracy
  • $20,000 to National Review Institute
  • $6,000 to Saint Vincent College
  • $10,000 to Association of Private Enterprise Education Inc
  • $15,000 to Liberty Foundation of America

2013

Total Fellowships and Grants distributed to Atlas partners in 2013 = $3,794,410 [13]

Below is a breakdown of the regions that received grants for "economic education": [11]

  • $170,196 to Sub-Saharan Africa
  • $155,850 to East Asia and the Pacific
  • $200,299 to North America
  • $1,381,186 to Europe
  • $595,209 to South America
  • $219,287 to the Middle East
  • $14,500 to Central America
  • $518,677 to South Asia
  • $2,845,041 to Central America

The following domestic organizations received grants from the Atlas Network in 2013: [11]

2012

Total Grants and Awards distributed to Atlas partners in 2012 = $3,515,000 [14] [11]

Below is a breakdown of the regions that received grants for "economic education": [11]

  • $45,093 to Sub-Saharan Africa
  • $133,800 to East Asia and the Pacific
  • $316,509 to North America
  • $940,037 to Europe
  • $454,384 to South America
  • $29,910 to the Middle East
  • $9,210 to Central America
  • $469,150 to South Asia
  • $57,050 to Russia

The following domestic organizations received grants from the Atlas Network in 2012: [11]

2011

Total Fellowships and Grants distributed to Atlas partners in 2011 = $3,238,239 [15] [11]

Below is a breakdown of the regions that received grants for "economic education" [11]

  • $102,983 to Sub-Saharan Africa
  • $384,727 to East Asia and the Pacific
  • $207,609 to North America
  • $1,130,290 to Europe
  • $555,180 to South America
  • $44,525 to the Middle East
  • $26,825 to Central America
  • $31,492 to South Asia

The following domestic organizations received grants from the Atlas Network in 2011 [11]

2010

Total Fellowships and Grants distributed to Atlas partners in 2010 = $2,575,202 [16]

Below is a breakdown of the regions that received grants for "economic education" [11]

  • $88,836 to Sub-Saharan Africa
  • $300,374 to East Asia and the Pacific
  • $139,190 to North America
  • $886,893 to Europe
  • $432,023 to South America
  • $48,852 to the Middle East & North Africa

The following domestic organizations received grants from the Atlas Network in 2010 [11]

2009

The 2009 Atlas Form 990 shows under $650k in grants (to organizations, governments and individuals) in the U.S., and over $2m outside the U.S.

Outside the U.S., it listed "economic education" expenditures of: [17]

  • $125, 203 to Sub-Saharan Africa
  • $392,016 to East Asia and the Pacific
  • $39,344 to North America
  • $1,054,152 to Europe
  • $427,498 to South America
  • $54,980 to the Middle East

Inside the U.S., Atlas listed mostly grants of roughly $10,000, including one to the Sam Adams Alliance ($10,200); though some grants were larger, e.g. the George Mason University Foundation got $50,000.

PR tips

While Atlas calculates that its "family" comprises approximately one-third of the world's 470 "market oriented" think tanks, it worries that "many young think tanks lack know-how regarding reaching the media and communicating a message effectively." To help build skills, Atlas recruited Vince Breglio, co-founder and senior executive with the market research and public relations company Wirthlin Worldwide.

At its mid-August conference in Salt Lake City, Breglio gave PR tips in a two-hour workshop titled "communicating the message of liberty." A veteran of the 1980 and 1984 Reagan Presidential campaigns, Breglio is no stranger to helping sell unpopular ideas. Internal tobacco industry documents reveal he advised both R.J. Reynolds and Philip Morris on public opposition to smoking.

According to an Atlas report on the conference, Breglio told participants in the two-hour workshop that building a larger supporter base depends on "persuading by reason, motivating by emotion." [18]

"Breglio showed the workshop a methodical approach to identifying the "emotional drivers" that motivate individuals on a given issue, and then developing a communications strategy that links a product or idea to the needs of an audience," the conference report stated. [18]

Funding

Other Top Donors

Other top donors between 2000-2014, per Conservative Transparency [19]

The Atlas Network receives much of its funding from libertarian and right-wing organizations and individuals. The following all gave at least $25,000 in 2014: [20]

Contributions Between 2005-2009

2005-2009 donations to Atlas ranged from almost $4m in 2005 to almost 6.5m in 2008. [21] In 2006, one individual gave Atlas $743,000, according to the group's 2007 Form 990; the next highest donation was $500,000.

Atlas has gained financial support the British mutual fund businessman, John Templeton. The Templeton foundation - in conjunction with Atlas - has established the Templeton Freedom Prizes for Excellence in Promoting Liberty. The prizes, $10,000 for the winner and $5,000 for the runner up are for "market-oriented poverty programs; for ethics and values; for social entrepreneurship and for student outreach". Under the awards it is planned that $1.25 million will be distributed between now and 2007.

The Charles G. Koch Foundation and the Claude R. Lambe Foundation both support the Atlas Economic Research Foundation. [22] $113,800 received from Koch foundations 2005–2008

Total Koch foundation grants to the Atlas Network between 1997–2008 = $122,300. [22]

Contributions Before 2005

The foundation's funding comes from corporate and institutional sources. During 2002, $193,500 of the organization's funding came from the Earhart Foundation, $100,000 from the Sarah Scaife Foundation, and $50,000 from the Carthage Foundation. The Earhart Foundation has given more than $1m since 1995. [23]

Known corporate donors include ExxonMobil, which according to the Greenpeace website ExxonSecrets.org, contributed $1,082,500 between 1998 and 2014. Exxon itself discloses contributions of $65,000 in 1998 (then Exxon). [24]

Ironically, Atlas requires its protégé think tanks to be "independent." In an April 1999 interview, Atlas President Alejandro A. Chaufen said, "Our mission is to help start and develop independent public-policy research groups. I mean truly independent. That is, independent of corporations, independent of governments, independent of political parties and even independent of universities." [25]

In a May 1998 fundraising pitch to tobacco giant Phillip Morris, Chaufen explained that keeping its think tanks off the dole of political parties, universities, government agencies and lobbies "helps keep their ideas and recommendations untainted by real or perceived political or organizational ties" and "helps protect them (and us) against potential scandal. Think tanks tied to politicians and parties can easily become instruments of corruption. Indeed, in several instances, public officials have enriched themselves and their allies through the 'think tanks' they control," Chaufen wrote.[1] [26]

In 1995 alone Philip Morris contributed $475,000 to Atlas according to an internal budget document released as part of the settlement of the legal action brought by several U.S. states' attorneys general. In 1997, despite a tight budget, PM staff recommended Atlas receive $150,000 because of the organization's ability, through its events and public advocacy work, to "positively impact the regulatory environment, particularly in Latin America." The think tanks fostered by Atlas, PM staff wrote approvingly, results in "an improved operating environment for all PM businesses."

Core Financials

2016 [9]

  • Total Revenue: $15,350,848
  • Total Expenses: $13,564,842
  • Net Assets: $8,040,321

2015 [11]

  • Total Revenue: $11,464,436
  • Total Expenses: $11,098,132
  • Net Assets: $6,254,315
  • Grants and similar amounts paid: $4,253,385

2014 [11]

  • Total Revenue: $9,482,857
  • Total Expenses: $10,277,040
  • Net Assets: $5,987,470
  • Grants and similar amounts paid: $4,354,783

2013 [11]

  • Total Revenue: $11,596,955
  • Total Expenses: $8,627,157
  • Net Assets: $6,781,518
  • Grants and similar amounts paid: $3,794,410

2012 [11]

  • Total Revenue: $8,651,314
  • Total Expenses: $8,153,489
  • Net Assets: $3,651,331
  • Grants and similar amounts paid: $3,520,584

2011 [11]

  • Total Revenue: $9,262,773
  • Total Expenses: $8,167,015
  • Net Assets: $3,030,822
  • Grants and similar amounts paid: $3,238,239

2010 [11]

  • Total Revenue: $6,102,160
  • Total Expenses: $7,701,798
  • Net Assets: $2,041,352
  • Grants and similar amounts paid: $2,575,202

2009 [11]

  • Total Revenue: $5,649,679
  • Total Expenses: $7,721,847
  • Net Assets: $3,538,330
  • Grants and similar amounts paid: $2,733,021

Personnel

Staff

As of 2016:[27] [9]

  • James Anderson, Development Associate
  • Daniel Anthony, Vice President of Marketing and Communications
  • Elisa Bishop, Director of Institute Relations and Programs
  • Jim Cardillo, Vice President of Finance and Administration
  • Shannon Carter, Office Manager
  • Cindy Cerquitella, Atlas Leadership Academy Director
  • Alejandro Chafuen, Ph.D., President
  • Erwin Chaloupka, Economic Policy Associate for Central and Eastern Europe
  • Brittany Gunkler, Development and Events Manager
  • Kristina Crane, Operations Manager
  • Grace Courter Hayes, Marketing and Communications Manager
  • Stephanie Giovanetti Lips, Director of Outreach
  • Brad Lips, Chief Executive Officer
  • Laura Liu, Economic and Trade Policy Advisor
  • Rómulo López, Director of Finance and Administration
  • Matthew Meyer, Development Associate
  • Nicholas Miller, Development Associate
  • Dr. Tom G. Palmer, George M. Yeager Chair for Advancing Liberty; Executive Vice President for International Programs
  • Austin Pickrell, Digital Manager
  • Casey Pifer, Institute Relations and Programs Manager
  • Katherine Price, Manager of Special Projects & Assistant to the CEO
  • Lisa Roberts, Major Gifts Officer
  • Clark Ruper, Director of Development
  • Chelsea Schick, Associate Director of Events
  • Jeremy Schofield, IT Manager
  • Austin Skiera, Marketing and Communications Associate
  • Alexander Skouras, Director of External Relations
  • Vale Sloane, Institute Relations and Programs Associate
  • Martin Stillman, Institute Relations and Programs Associate
  • Tarun Vats, Program Manager - Atlas Leadership Academy
  • Matt Warner, Chief Operating Officer
  • Mariana Zepeda, Research Associate and Assistant to the President
  • Reza Ansari
  • Eric D. Dixon
  • Kadi Stoffey

Former Staff

  • Leonard Liggio, Executive Vice President - Academics
  • Colleen Dyble, Associate Director of Institute Relations
  • Jo Kwong, Director of Institute Relations
  • Chris Martin, Associate Director of Programs
  • Elena Ziebarth, Associate Director of Public Affairs
  • Joyce Schroeder, Office Manager
  • Priscilla Tacujan, Assistant to the Executive Vice President

Advisory Council

As of 2016:[9]

  • Charles Albers
  • Dale Bottoms
  • Montgomery Brown
  • John Cerasuolo
  • Derwood Chase
  • Stuart Chase
  • Sam Corcos
  • Peter Goettler
  • Dan Gressel
  • Nicolas Ibanez
  • Rajesh Jain
  • Bob Jefferies
  • Leo Kayser III
  • John Kayser
  • Warren Lammert III
  • Ron Manners
  • Maralene Martin
  • Oscar Garcia Mendoza
  • Alberto Mestre
  • Luis Miranda
  • Wayne Olson
  • Luis Perez
  • Dan Peters
  • Nadine Prah
  • Lauren Templeton
  • Jon Basil Utley
  • Mariela Vicini
  • Vann Walke
  • Shari Williams

Board Members

As of 2016:[9]

  • Lawson Bader
  • Luis Henrique Ball
  • Scott Barbee, Treasurer
  • Robert Boyd
  • Timothy Browne
  • Dr. Alejandro A. Chafuen
  • Debbi Gibbs, Vice Chair
  • Dan Grossman
  • Nikolaos Monoyios
  • Gerry Ohrstrom
  • George Pearson
  • Andrea Millen Rich
  • René Scull
  • Kathryn Washburn
  • Linda Whetstone, Chair
  • Amb. Curtain Winsor, Jr.
  • William Sumner, Board Member Emeritus

Former Board Members

  • Luis Henrique Ball, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of GrupoCiencia and Allegheny Medical Systems
  • Scott Barbee, Owner and President of Aegis Financial Corporation
  • Timothy Browne, Private Investor and Independent Consultant
  • Alejandro Chafuen, President at the Atlas Network
  • Debbi Gibbs, Owner of Just Managing
  • Peter Goettler, former Managing Director at Barclays Capital
  • Dan Grossman, Chairman of the Board for Atlas Network
  • Nikolaos (Nikos) Monoyios, Private Investor and Co-Owner of Eagle Valley Ranch
  • Gerry Ohrstrom, Private Investor and former Chairman of the Ohrstrom Foundation
  • George Pearson, former Director of Public Affairs of Koch Industries and Investor
  • Andrea Millen Rich, President of Center for Independent Thought
  • René Scull, former Vice President of Philip Morris
  • Kathryn Washburn, Board Member at the Niskanen Center
  • Linda Whetstone, Chairman of Network for a Free Society
  • Curtin Winsor, Jr., former U.S. Ambassador to Costa Rica
  • William Sumner, Board Member Emeritus
  • Alejandro Garza Lagüera
  • James Arthur Pope, Vice Chairman
  • Chuck Albers
  • John Blundell
  • Abby Moffatt

Contact Information

Employer Identification Number (EIN): 94-2763845

Atlas Network
1201 L Street NW
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-449-8449
Fax: 202-280-1259

Email: info@AtlasNetwork.org
Website: https://www.atlasnetwork.org
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/atlasnetwork
Twitter: https://twitter.com/atlasnetwork

Global Directory of Atlas Network Partners: https://www.atlasnetwork.org/partners/global-directory

Atlas Network Publications

Articles and Resources

Related SourceWatch Articles

External Articles

References

  1. State Policy Network, Washington, DC: Associates, State Policy Network website, Accessed August 17, 2017.
  2. Amy Goodwin and Lee Fang, Lee Fang on How a Little-Known U.S. Libertarian Think Tank Is Remaking Latin American Politics, Democracy Now, August 11, 2017.
  3. Lee Fang, Sphere of Influence: How American Libertarians are Remaking Latin American Politics, The Intercept August 9, 2017.
  4. State Policy Network, Washington, DC: Associates, State Policy Network website, Accessed August 17, 2017.
  5. Rebekah Wilce, Center for Media and Democracy, EXPOSED: The State Policy Network -- The Powerful Right-Wing Network Helping to Hijack State Politics and Government, organizational report, November 13, 2013.
  6. Jane Mayer, Is IKEA the New Model for the Conservative Movement?, The New Yorker, November 15, 2013.
  7. Ed Pilkington and Suzanne Goldenberg, State conservative groups plan US-wide assault on education, health and tax, The Guardian, December 5, 2013.
  8. Greenpeace, Atlas Network: Koch Industries Climate Denial Front Group, Greenpeace website, Accessed August 17, 2017.
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 9.3 9.4 Atlas Network, Annual Reports & Financials: Atlas Network Annual Report 2016, ATLAS Network website, 2016.
  10. Atlas Network, Annual Reports & Financials: Atlas Network 2015 Year in Review, Atlas Network website, 2015.
  11. 11.00 11.01 11.02 11.03 11.04 11.05 11.06 11.07 11.08 11.09 11.10 11.11 11.12 11.13 11.14 11.15 11.16 11.17 11.18 11.19 11.20 11.21 ProPublica, Atlas Network (Atlas Economic Research Foundation), ProPublica: NonProfit Explorer website, Accessed August 16, 2017.
  12. Atlas Network, 2014 Exempt Organization Business Tax Return, Atlas Network website, 2014.
  13. Atlas Network, Annual Reports & Financials: 2013 Audit Report, Atlas Network website, 2013.
  14. Atlas Network, Annual Reports & Financials: Atlas Network 2012 Year in Review, Atlas Network website, 2012.
  15. Atlas Network, Annual Reports & Financials: 2011 Audit Report, Atlas Network website, 2011.
  16. Atlas Network, Annual Reports & Financials: 2010 Audit Report, Atlas Network website, 2010.
  17. Atlas Network, Annual Reports & Financials: Annual Reports & Financials: 2009 Form 990, Atlas Network website, Accessed August 17, 2017.
  18. 18.0 18.1 Atlas Economic Research Foundation, Atlas Reports: Communicating the Ideal of Liberty, Archive.org website, August 13-14, 2004.
  19. Conservative Transparency, Top Supporters of Atlas Economic Research Foundation, Conservative Transparency website, Accessed August 16, 2017.
  20. Atlas Network, Annual Reports & Financials: Year in Review 2014, Atlas Network website, 2014.
  21. Atlas Network, Annual Reports & Financials: 2009 Form 990, Atlas Network website, Accessed August 17, 2017.
  22. 22.0 22.1 , Greenpeace USA, Koch Industries Secretly Funding the Climate Denial Machine, Archive.org website, March 2010.
  23. Media Transparency, Grant Data Matrix: Recipients by amount granted by the Earhart Foundation, Archive.org website, Accessed August 17, 2017.
  24. ExxonMobil, Community and Sponsorships: Public Information and Policy Research, Archive.org website, Accessed August 17, 2017.
  25. Eli Lehrer, The Atlas Foundation Shoulders the World, Insight on the News, Accessed August 17, 2017,
  26. Alejandro A. Chaufen, Atlas Economic Research Foundation Letter: May 8, 1998, UCSF, Truth Tobacco Industry Documents website, Accessed August 17, 2017.
  27. Atlas Network, Our People, Atlas Network website, Accessed August 16, 2017.

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